for shame

for shame

An expression of angry or disappointed condemnation. For shame! You know better than to steal your sister's toys! I can't believe she took advantage of your feelings like that—for shame!
See also: shame

For shame!

That is shameful! Sue: Did you hear that Tom was in jail? Fred: For shame! What did he do? Sue: Nobody knows. Mary: I've decided not to go to the conference. John: For shame! Who will represent us?

for shame

Also, shame on you. An expression that condemns someone for being dishonorable or disgraceful. For example, " For shame," said Carol to the puppy, "You shouldn't have done that," or "Shame on you for cheating," the teacher said. [c. 1300]
See also: shame
References in periodicals archive ?
(23-25) Finally, childhood adversity is significantly associated with both anxiety and shame (5); consequently, dancers with a history of ACEs may be at increased risk for shame and anxiety.
in the writing process offers new opportunities for shame. The writer
The purpose of this paper, however, is not to sift through Bion's work searching for shame. Rather, I want to use some of his theoretical ideas to start to think about shame affects based on realisations that have emerged in my work with shame-prone patients.
In the present study, reliabilities were at levels considered as questionable to good (Streiner, 2003) for shame (.82), guilt (.83), detachment (.60), and externalization (.78).
According to James Twitchell's For Shame: The Loss of Common Decency in American Culture (1997), Daniel Patrick Moynihan devised the phrase "defining deviancy down" to "describe how we legitimize behavior previously regarded as antisocial or criminal." (Cole Porter made the same point more entertainingly in his song "Anything Goes.") The admonition to "judge not, that ye be not judged" has become translated from a high principle of moral restraint into a quid pro quo, a backscratching beatitude of the streets; I will agree not to hold your deeds to high moral standards so long as you agree to let me slide, too.
Considered in this light, Austen's work helps to establish a central role for shame, as much as sensibility, in the development of the British novel--a role that, to the extent that emotional immersion in a text continues to be culturally constructed as somehow shameful, addresses ongoing questions about the possibilities for impassioned critical insights in our contemporary interpretive practices.
(52) Urging human rights organizations to focus their activities on certain types of fights, Roth argued that there must be "relative clarity about the nature of the violation, violator, and remedy" in order for shame to be an effective mobilizer of change in governments.
Bewes deconstructs the ontology of the subject that sustains Sartre's formulation of the perceptual relation that engenders the structure of shame (a formal relation that cannot be viewed as an ethical response to political inequality, but must be seen as a determinant condition built into the very apparatus of power), by arguing for shame as an experience of the dissolution and evacuation of the self.
Overall, given the scarcity of research on effective treatment options for shame and the scholarly support for the use of mindfulness and acceptance-based approaches, it is reasonable to suggest using a mindfulness approach to treat shame.
The median score for shame (median=16) in the data suggests that 50 percent or more of the students who completed the survey at times felt shamed by others in reference to a range of personal attributes.
Couroy (2001) found that those who fail have the notion they will experience social isolation, which according to Katz (1999), is a direct cause for shame. Utilizing the tenets of cognitive-motivational-relational theory (Lazarus, 1991, 2000), Conroy, Poczwardowski, and Henschen (2001) explored this concept through interviews with sixteen elite athletes and performing artists and found support for the existence of several fear of failure appraisals that are consistent with shame, such as "demonstrating that I have low ability" (p.
This could be a prerequisite for shame and honour to work in other contexts," co-author Arne Traulsen from the Max Planck Institute said.
congress so that new regulatory regimes are not adopted, since regulation, which is enforceable in the courts, is a substitute for shame in the United States.
It's easy enough for enlightened members of the comfortable classes to insist there's no reason for shame: You didn't bring the layoff down on yourself; you didn't determine that the maximum wage in your line of work would be in the neighborhood of $8 an hour.