for (someone or something)

(redirected from for it)

for (someone or something)

Supporting or approving of someone or something. Can you believe he's for building that new shopping center right in the middle of town?

for one

As one example or reason (out of several potential ones). Often used after a name or personal pronoun to count someone or oneself as an example of something. Why don't I like musicals? Well, for one, I just can't take a story seriously when it's set to music. I can tell you that I for one am really happy about the changes to the tax law they've introduced. A: "Who is coming to the movie later?" B: "Mary, for one, but I haven't heard back from anyone else."
See also: one

(all) for someone or something

Fig. (completely) in favor of someone or something; supporting someone or something. I'm all for your candidacy. I'm for the incumbent in the upcoming election.

for

(some) days running and for (some) weeks running; for (some) months running; for (some) years running days in a series; months in a series; etc. (The some can be any number.) I had a bad cold for five days running. For two years running, I brought work home from the office every night.

for

(some) years running Go to for (some) days running.

for one

Also, for one thing. As the first of several possible instances. For example, Everything seemed to go wrong; for one, we had a flat tire, and then we lost the keys, or I find many aspects of your proposal to be inadequate; for one thing, you don't specify where you'll get the money . For one can also be applied to a person, as in He doesn't like their behavior, and I for one agree with him.
See also: one

for

/in fun
As a joke; playfully.

for

/to all intents and purposes
In every practical sense; practically: To all intents and purposes the case is closed.
References in classic literature ?
And then ounly percave the cuteness of the swate angel, for no sooner did she obsarve that I was afther the squazing of her flipper, than she up wid it in a jiffy, and put it away behind her back, jist as much as to say, "Now thin, Sir Pathrick O'Grandison, there's a bitther chance for ye, mavourneen, for it's not altogether the gentaal thing to be afther the squazing of my flipper right full in the sight of that little furrenner Frinchman, Mounseer Maiter-di-dauns."
Ye may jist say, though (for it's God's thruth), that afore I left hould of the flipper of the spalpeen (which was not till afther her leddyship's futman had kicked us both down the stairs, I giv'd it such a nate little broth of a squaze as made it all up into raspberry jam.
You see, it won't ever do for me, a brigadier in the regular army, to preside over that infant court-martial - there isn't any precedent for it, don't you see.
He said we mightn't ever get another chance to see one, and he was going to look his fill at this one if he died for it. So I looked too, though it give me the fan-tods to do it.
She has such a passion for it, I often tell her if everything else fails, she can be a horsebreaker, and get her living so."
Bartel went into his little pantry, and brought out an excellent home-baked loaf; for it was his one extravagance in these dear times to eat bread once a-day instead of oat-cake; and he justified it by observing, that what a schoolmaster wanted was brains, and oat-cake ran too much to bone instead of brains.
But now it's only once in a while you'll find a plot--and never when you're looking for it. You jest have to stumble on it--you're walking along on the sand hills, never thinking of sweet-grass--and all at once the air is full of sweetness-- and there's the grass under your feet.
After that he gave a long sigh of satisfaction; for it seemed to him that he was safe.
'I'd pay for it and pay well,' said he, 'if I could get some stuff that would suit my editor.' I said what I thought would please him best, and he handed me a twenty-dollar bill for my information.
If he counted them up as he ought, he would see that every lot has enough happiness provided for it. And what if all goes well with the family, if the blessing of God is upon it, if the husband is a good one, loves you, cherishes you, never leaves you!
"No, it wouldn't do -- there ain't necessity enough for it."
"Good land!" I says; "why, there ain't NO neces- sity for it. And what would you want to saw his leg off for, anyway?"
"He HAS got use for it. How YOU talk, you better say; you don't know nothing about it.
I'll send it willingly; for it is but right he should have proper attendance while he's ill."
And it's for your own good I say this, for it's right you should feel what your state is, and what disgrace your husband's brought on your own family, as you've got to look to for everything, and be humble in your mind."