for free


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for free

1. Without requiring a payment in return. The owner gave us some pastries for free because he was about to close the shop for the day.
2. A phrase used to highlight how passionately or intensely one believes something. Listen, I can tell you this for free: if he hasn't called you yet, he's not going to call, period.
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for free

for no charge or cost; free of any cost. They let us into the movie for free. I will let you have a sample of the candy for free.
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for free

Without charge, gratis, as in You can't expect the doctor to treat you for free. [Colloquial; c. 1900]
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for free

without cost or payment; free of charge. informal
1957 Godfrey Smith The Friends Back home we pay if we're ill…You don't expect to be ill for free.
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for ˈfree


1 without having to pay: Some children got into the cinema for free by using old tickets.
2 used for emphasizing how strongly you feel about something: The whole plan is a disaster. I can tell you that for free.
See also: free

for free

mod. free from monetary charge; gratis. Is all this really mine for free?
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for free

Informal
Without charge.
See also: free
References in periodicals archive ?
Irwin builds a much more practical and empirical case for free trade in Free Trade Under Fire, Trade, he notes, is a vital engine of economic growth, especially in the United States, where exports and imports together make up about 25 percent of gross domestic product.
But these two books make a powerful case for free trade--a case that apparently must be made again and again.
To a striking extent, the case they make for free trade bears no relation to the one made by Adam Smith and his successors in the economics profession.
Admittedly, the case for free trade is to some degree hypothetical and counterintuitive.
What economists have done well is to work out the technical conditions under which free trade promotes the general welfare, and on this issue the consensus for free trade is nearly unanimous.
With the self-interest of many industries, a new congressional majority, and the ever-declining power of private-sector unions all converging, it has never been more possible to harness a powerful political alliance for free trade, uniting ideology and interest.
Instead, he ignores Madison's "complete exemption" of the press from regulation and harks back to the 1930s and proposes a "New Deal" that would do for a free press and the First Amendment what Roosevelt's New Deal did for free markets and the right of contract.
In Mexico and throughout Latin America, the perceived betrayal by the United States could seriously undermine support for free trade and free-market reforms generally.