for better or for worse


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for better or (for) worse

Whether something is good or bad. Our marriage has had its share of challenges, but we've vowed to stay together, for better or for worse. For better or worse, he's your brother. And he needs your help.
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for better or for worse

under any conditions; no matter what happens. I married you for better or for worse. For better or for worse, I'm going to quit my job.
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for better or for worse

Under good or bad circumstances, with good or bad effect. For example, For better or for worse he trusts everyone. This term became widely familiar because it appears in the marriage service of the Book of Common Prayer (1549): "With this ring I thee wed, for richer or poorer, in sickness and in health, for better or worse, til death do us part." [Late 1300s]
See also: better, worse

for ˌbetter or (for) ˈworse

whether the result is good or bad: I’ve decided, for better or for worse, to leave my job.
See also: better, worse

for better or (for) worse

Whether the situation or consequences be good or ill: For better or worse, he trusts everyone.
See also: better, worse

for better or for worse

In whatever circumstances, good or bad. The term became famous through its presence in the marriage service of the Book of Common Prayer (1549), where bride and bridegroom each must pledge to hold by the other “for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness or in health.” This expression was derived from the still older Sarum Manual (ca. 1500), which in turn may have taken it from John Gower’s Confessio Amantis (ca. 1390), “For bet, for wers, for oght, for noght.” Today it is used quite loosely, as in “For better or for worse, I’ve made a down payment on the condo.”
See also: better, worse
References in periodicals archive ?
It seems like something of a minor tragedy to me that the last few years have seen the early passing of such comic strips as Breathed's "Outlandand" "Bloom County," Larson's "The Far Side," and now Watterson's "Calvin and Hobbes." Gratefully, there continue to be some wonderful strips like Schultz's "Peanuts," Guisewite's "Cathy," Parker's "B.C.," Johnston's "For Better or For Worse," Doug Marlette's "Kudzu," and Trudeau's "Doonesbury." And let's hope there will continue to be new and refreshingly quirky strips invigorating the funnies in the future.
It's named after the late dog who was a character in Lynn Johnston's "For Better or For Worse" comic.
"For Better or For Worse" runs in more than 2,000 newspapers via Universal Press Syndicate.
It now includes more biographical information about cartoonist Lynn Johnston, including her early days as an artist, samples of her student drawings, and what led to "For Better or For Worse" entering syndication in 1979.
It has been 12 years since Farley died, but he still handily won a reader poll as the favorite pet in "For Better or For Worse.
"For Better or For Worse" is in the news, for better or for worse.