for auld lang syne

for auld lang syne

In honor of old times. "Auld lang syne" is a Scottish phrase meaning "old long since." Come on, you're only in town for a few days—let's go to dinner for auld lang syne.
See also: auld, lang, syne

for auld lang syne

for old times' sake.
The phrase literally means ‘for old long since’, and is the title and refrain of a song by Robert Burns ( 1788 ).
See also: auld, lang, syne
References in classic literature ?
We'll `tak a cup o' kindness yet for auld lang syne.'"
I fear you are out at elbows; but we must see to that for auld lang syne, as once we sang at suppers.'
"And you needn't Mr Venus be your black bottle, For surely I'll be mine, And we'll take a glass with a slice of lemon in it to which you're partial, For auld lang syne."'
Chorus: For auld lang syne, my dear For auld lang syne, We'll tak a cup o'kindness yet For auld lang syne!
Consequently, "For auld lang syne", as it appears in the first line of the chorus, might be loosely translated as "for (the sake of ) old times".
For Auld Lang Syne, my dear For Auld Lang Syne We'll make next year the best one yet For Auld Lang Syne
The title of Robert (Rabbie) Burns' folk song is strictly translated into English as 'old long since' so when people sing 'for auld lang syne' it is generally taken to mean for 'old times' sake'.
And we'll tak a right gude-willy waught, for auld lang syne," are sung.
They conclude with the singing of Auld Lang Syne, the words of which no one south of the border knows, apart from the chorus, which is just as well as it includes the immortal line: we'll tak a right gude willie waught for auld lang syne.
It has his lines "we'll tak a cup o' kindness yet, for auld lang syne" on the tails side.
And gie's a hand o thine, And we'll tak a right guid-willie waught, For auld lang syne
Chorus: For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne, We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet, For auld lang syne.
One of the verses of (http://www.scotland.org/features/the-history-and-words-of-auld-lang-syne) "Auld Lang Syne" that is less often sung by New Year's revelers includes the line: "We'll take a cup of kindness yet, for Auld Lang Syne." Helping people faced with the onset of dementia in a friend learn from others how to fill, share and take sustenance from that "cup of kindness" is one of the ways that anthropological research strives to make the world a bit better place.
"Auld lang syne" literally translates to English as "old long since." It loosely, or idiomatically, translates as "old times." "For auld lang syne" is "for the sake of old times."
(Chorus) For auld lang syne, my dear For auld lang syne, We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet, For (the sake of) auld lang syne 2 And surely ye'll be your pint-stowp!