footloose and fancy-free

footloose and fancy-free

Free of responsibilities, including romantic commitments (a fact that is often highlighted when this phrase is used). I love being a single woman, so I intend to be footloose and fancy-free for a long time. Now that I have a family and a mortgage, I miss being footloose and fancy-free.
See also: and, footloose
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

footloose and fancy-free

Fig. without long-term responsibilities or commitments. All the rest of them have wives, but John is footloose and fancy-free. Mary never stays long in any job. She likes being footloose and fancy-free.
See also: and, footloose
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

footloose and fancy-free

Having no attachments, especially romantic ones, and free to do as one pleases. For example, When I was in my twenties, footloose and fancy-free, I would travel at the drop of a hat . Both of these words have long been used separately; their pairing dates only from the 1900s.
See also: and, footloose
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

footloose and fancy-free

OLD-FASHIONED
If someone is footloose and fancy-free, they are not married or in a long-term relationship, or they have very few responsibilities. He was footloose and fancy-free. He could go to parties and pubs on his own, and come and go as he pleased. Note: This term refers to a sail that could move about freely because the ropes holding it at the foot or bottom were loose.
See also: and, footloose
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

footloose and fancy-free

without any commitments or responsibilities; free to act or travel as you please.
Footloose was used literally in the late 17th century to mean ‘free to move the feet’. The sense ‘without commitments’ originated in late 19th-century US usage. Fancy in fancy-free is used in the sense of ‘love’ or ‘the object of someone's affections’.
See also: and, footloose
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌfootloose and fancy-ˈfree

free to go where you like or do what you want because you have no responsibilities: Here she was, at forty, footloose and fancy-free in New York.
See also: and, footloose
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

footloose and fancy-free

Unattached, especially in the sense of romantic involvement. The word footloose, meaning free to go anywhere, originated in the late seventeenth century. Fancy-free, meaning not in love (fancy once meant “in love”), dates from the sixteenth century. It was used by Shakespeare in A Midsummer Night’s Dream (2.2), where Oberon tells Puck, “But I might see young Cupid’s fiery shaft quench’d in the chaste beams of the watery moon, and the imperial votaress passed on, in maiden-meditation, fancy-free.”
See also: and, footloose
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

footloose and fancy free

Unattached, especially romantically, and able to move and act without responsibilities. The “foot” is the bottom of a sail, and a sail that is footloose is free to move whichever way the wind blows. So is a person who is “footloose and fancy free,” at liberty to follow any and all whims. (Such a state sounds enviable, but keep in mind the fable about “The Grasshopper and the Ant.”)
See also: and, fancy, footloose, free
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Weill's spring summer 2019 tells the story of a woman's summer of love being footloose and fancy-free as she roams France travelling from Paris to Deavuille in heart-covered tops, scarves and dresses.
I have a lot more Instagram followers suddenly." Lux admits he is footloose and fancy-free, but the Kyrgyz heartthrob insists he's finding it hard to come to terms with his new-found fame.
Life as a footloose and fancy-free traveller has clearly been hampered by the need to base herself in one place (Auckland) and earn some money.
They looked at what we ask and want from our cars in each decade of our lives as we change from footloose and fancy-free 20-somethings right through to drivers in our 60s.
After facing jail time and a lawsuit, the Armenian belly dancer is finally footloose and fancy-free after resolving her standing disputes with the hotel, whom she signed a contract with in 2009 upon her arrival to Egypt.
While Harris is now planning to have a family with his wife Cherie, it was all about living footloose and fancy-free in his early cricket days, the report added.
Most of the birds are this time of year footloose and fancy-free.
That is not as a source of pride but a damning indictment of Britain's descent into a Treasure Island tax haven for a footloose and fancy-free international elite.
He said the police had been "deceptive" and "played footloose and fancy-free" with valuable property.
Though they're happy to come in early, stay late and even fill in when employees can't make it, the lynches make the most of being "footloose and fancy-free," says Chris.
Both girls have admitted they love being footloose and fancy-free.
'In light of all the media reports about anti-social behaviour, we all know that anti-social behaviour occurs when kids are footloose and fancy-free and are not occupying themselves.
He canoodled with Anouska and whispered in her ear: "I'm footloose and fancy-free." Next he grabbed blonde student Nush for a cuddle.
Inexplicably, Seth berates, badgers, threatens, and mistreats nearly all the locals, all the while bragging about a fortune he won gambling, recalling his romantic liaison with a young girl in India, adopting a little lost kitten (Perle), and carrying on with the minister's footloose and fancy-free daughter Helena.
'Because of that, I needed to be footloose and fancy-free. I needed to go where the work was.