footloose


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be footloose and fancy-free

To be free of responsibilities, including romantic commitments (a fact that is often highlighted when this phrase is used). I love being a single woman, so I intend to be footloose and fancy-free for a long time. Now that I have a family and a mortgage, I miss being footloose and fancy-free.
See also: and, footloose

footloose and fancy-free

Free of responsibilities, including romantic commitments (a fact that is often highlighted when this phrase is used). I love being a single woman, so I intend to be footloose and fancy-free for a long time. Now that I have a family and a mortgage, I miss being footloose and fancy-free.
See also: and, footloose
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

footloose and fancy-free

Fig. without long-term responsibilities or commitments. All the rest of them have wives, but John is footloose and fancy-free. Mary never stays long in any job. She likes being footloose and fancy-free.
See also: and, footloose
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

footloose and fancy-free

Having no attachments, especially romantic ones, and free to do as one pleases. For example, When I was in my twenties, footloose and fancy-free, I would travel at the drop of a hat . Both of these words have long been used separately; their pairing dates only from the 1900s.
See also: and, footloose
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

footloose and fancy-free

OLD-FASHIONED
If someone is footloose and fancy-free, they are not married or in a long-term relationship, or they have very few responsibilities. He was footloose and fancy-free. He could go to parties and pubs on his own, and come and go as he pleased. Note: This term refers to a sail that could move about freely because the ropes holding it at the foot or bottom were loose.
See also: and, footloose
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

footloose and fancy-free

without any commitments or responsibilities; free to act or travel as you please.
Footloose was used literally in the late 17th century to mean ‘free to move the feet’. The sense ‘without commitments’ originated in late 19th-century US usage. Fancy in fancy-free is used in the sense of ‘love’ or ‘the object of someone's affections’.
See also: and, footloose
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌfootloose and fancy-ˈfree

free to go where you like or do what you want because you have no responsibilities: Here she was, at forty, footloose and fancy-free in New York.
See also: and, footloose
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

footloose and fancy-free

Unattached, especially in the sense of romantic involvement. The word footloose, meaning free to go anywhere, originated in the late seventeenth century. Fancy-free, meaning not in love (fancy once meant “in love”), dates from the sixteenth century. It was used by Shakespeare in A Midsummer Night’s Dream (2.2), where Oberon tells Puck, “But I might see young Cupid’s fiery shaft quench’d in the chaste beams of the watery moon, and the imperial votaress passed on, in maiden-meditation, fancy-free.”
See also: and, footloose
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

footloose and fancy free

Unattached, especially romantically, and able to move and act without responsibilities. The “foot” is the bottom of a sail, and a sail that is footloose is free to move whichever way the wind blows. So is a person who is “footloose and fancy free,” at liberty to follow any and all whims. (Such a state sounds enviable, but keep in mind the fable about “The Grasshopper and the Ant.”)
See also: and, fancy, footloose, free
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
On day one of the annual showcase, there's Footloose , where you can expect tracks including Let's Hear It for the Boys and Holding Out For A Hero.
The score the show is a 1980s delight and includes Let's Hear it for the Boy, Holding Out for a Hero, Mama Says and of course the title song, Footloose.
But much of that 1980s nostalgia for "Footloose" is really more for its Top 40 music and its breakout star Kevin Bacon.
How far the government will commit to the idea of giving footloose firms an RCIT is still unclear, given that details are still being fleshed out.
According to Lopez, the DTI has thought of this extended GIE as an incentive to "footloose" projects to stay in the country because some of them employ as many as 20,000 Filipinos.
Minerva Club President, Colette Dunsmore, said: "Many people will remember the film Footloose and we're delighted to be bringing it to the stage.
Footloose is the story of Ren McCormack (Kevin Bacon), a teenager who has just moved from Chicago to a small rural town which has banned dancing and rock music due to efforts of the Reverend Shaw Moore (John Lithgow).
I've loved her since I first saw Footloose as a teenager.
Footloose Sunderland Empire Kick off your Sunday shoes and cut loose as the explosive rock 'n' roll musical sensation Footloose bursts on to Sunderland Empire's stage as part of its UK tour.
I'm going to start my review by making a rather criminal admission, especially for someone born in the 1980s - I've never seen Footloose!
REVIEW FOOTLOOSE, THE MUSICAL New Alexandra Theatre HHHHI FANS of Gareth Gates were naturally disappointed to discover the star was missing from this lively musical and some requested refunds on opening night, but if they went home they missed a treat.
He's now wearing a slightly different theatrical hat, playing the more jocular role of Willard in the stage production of Footloose.
MiddlesbroughYouth Theatre is gearing up for its next performance when Footloose rolls in to town.