footing


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foot the bill

To pay for something. I hope the production company is footing the bill for all of this air travel.
See also: bill, foot

foot up

To add or total something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "foot" and "up." Do you mind footing up the bill for us?
See also: foot, up

hotfoot

To travel as fast as one can, usually by walking or running. We need to hotfoot it out of here before Mom catches us going through her things!

hotfoot it

To travel as fast as one can, usually by walking or running. We need to hotfoot it out of here before Mom catches us going through her things!
See also: hotfoot

hotfoot it off to (some place)

To leave for some place as fast as one can, usually by walking or running. We need to hotfoot it off to the game, or we're going to be late.
See also: hotfoot, off

hotfoot it out of (some place)

To leave some place as fast as one can, usually by walking or running. We need to hotfoot it out of here before Mom catches us going through her things!
See also: hotfoot, of, out

lose (one's) footing

1. To slip, stumble, and/or fall during an activity in which one is using one's feet, such as walking, dancing, climbing, etc. I sprained my ankle when I lost my footing on a hike. Be careful not to lose your footing while you're on the ladder!
2. By extension, to lose one's stability by entering a precarious or unsettling situation. I loved my job, so I really lost my footing when I was laid off. I'm just worried that he'll lose his footing if he drops out of school now—there's no guarantee he'll ever go back.
See also: footing, lose

wrong-foot

1. In soccer, to make a shot that makes a defender or goal keeper stumble or lose balance. The midfielder scored the critical tie-breaking goal just minutes before the end of regular time, wrong-footing the keeper with an incredible shot to the top corner of the net.
2. By extension, to maneuver in such a way as to catch someone off guard, especially so as to put them in an awkward or disadvantageous position. The quick-witted journalist wrong-footed the politician several times during the interview. I'm not trying to wrong-foot the board of directors, I'm just trying to do what I think is morally correct.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

foot the bill (for something)

Fig. to pay for something; to pay for a bill. My boss took me out for lunch and the company footed the bill. You paid for dinner last time. Let me foot the bill for lunch today.
See also: bill, foot

hotfoot it (off to) (somewhere)

to go somewhere as fast as possible. I've got to hotfoot it off to school. When they heard the police sirens, the thieves hotfooted home.
See also: hotfoot
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

foot the bill

Pay the bill, settle the accounts, as in The bride's father was resigned to footing the bill for the wedding. This expression uses foot in the sense of "add up and put the total at the foot, or bottom, of an account." [Colloquial; early 1800s]
See also: bill, foot

hotfoot it

Go in haste, walk fast or run. For example, I'll have to hotfoot it to the airport if I'm to meet them. [Slang; c. 1900]
See also: hotfoot

wrong-foot

Deceive by moving differently from what one expects, as in He won quite a few points by wrong-footing his opponent. This expression comes from tennis, where it means to hit the ball in the direction the opponent is moving away from. It was transferred to other applications in the late 1900s, as in Susan Larson's review of a concert: "Music wrong-footing and deceiving the ear" ( Boston Globe, November 1, 1994).
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

foot the bill

COMMON If you foot the bill for something, you pay for it. Police will have to foot the bill for the damage to both cars. If the insurance industry were to foot the entire bill for pollution, it would bankrupt it. Note: This expression may come from the practice of someone paying a bill and signing it at the bottom, or `foot'.
See also: bill, foot
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

foot the bill

be responsible for paying for something.
See also: bill, foot
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

foot the ˈbill (for something)

be responsible for paying the cost of something: The local council will have to foot the bill for damage done to the roads in last years’s floods.
See also: bill, foot

ˈhotfoot it

(informal) walk or run somewhere quickly: Once the police arrived, we hotfooted it out of there.
See also: hotfoot
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

foot up

v.
To calculate something, especially by addition: The waiter footed up the bill at the end of the meal. Our producer footed the expenses up after the closing night of the play.
See also: foot, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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