fools rush in where angels fear to tread


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Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

Prov. Foolish people usually do not understand when a situation is dangerous, so they are not afraid to do things that would frighten more sensible people. Alan: Bob is too scared to go in and confront the boss, so I'm going to. Jane: Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.
See also: angel, fear, Fool, rush, tread

fools rush in where angels fear to tread

Ignorant or inexperienced individuals get involved in situations that wiser persons would avoid, as in I've never heard this symphony and here I am conducting it-oh well, fools rush in where angels fear to tread , or He tried to mediate their unending argument-fools rush in. This expression, so well known it is sometimes shortened as in the second example, is a quotation from Alexander Pope's Essay on Criticism (1709): "No place so sacred from such fops is barr'd ... Nay, fly to altars; there they'll talk you dead; For fools rush in where angels fear to tread."
See also: angel, fear, fool, rush, tread

fools rush in where angels fear to tread

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fools rush in

People say fools rush in where angels fear to tread or fools rush in to mean that stupid people often do or say things without thinking enough about them first. `Sometimes I stop and think, Good God, how did I get into this,' she says with a laugh. `Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.' That was something none of the three of us would have dared to say. Fools rush in... Note: This expression is often varied, especially by using other words instead of fools and angels. Amateurs rush in where professionals fear to tread. Note: This proverb comes from Alexander Pope's `An Essay on Criticism' (1711).
See also: angel, fear, fool, rush, tread
References in periodicals archive ?
For fools rush in where angels fear to tread," wrote Alexander Pope in An Essay on Criticism.