foolish

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Related to foolishly: speedily, magnificently, immensely, harshly

be penny-wise and pound-foolish

To be so concerned with saving money that one ignores larger problems and ultimately ends up spending more. I know you don't want to pay for this expensive course of treatment, but when ignoring your health lands you in the hospital, you'll see that you were penny-wise and pound-foolish.
See also: and

penny-wise and pound-foolish

So concerned with saving money in any way possible that one fails to allocate money to things that will ultimately force one to spend more (due to lack of quality, proper maintenance, etc). I know you don't want to pay for this expensive course of treatment, but when ignoring your health lands you in the hospital and you have to miss work, you'll see that you were penny-wise and pound-foolish.
See also: and

penny-wise and pound-foolish

Prov. thrifty with small sums and foolish with large sums. (Describes someone who will go to a lot of trouble to save a little money, but overlooks large expenses to save a little money. Even in the United States, the reference is to British pounds sterling.) Sam: If we drive to six different grocery stores, we'll get the best bargains on everything we buy. Alan: But with gasoline so expensive, that's penny-wise and pound-foolish.
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penny wise and pound foolish

Stingy about small expenditures and extravagant with large ones, as in Dean clips all the coupons for supermarket bargains but insists on going to the best restaurants-penny wise and pound foolish . This phrase alludes to British currency, in which a pound was once worth 240 pennies, or pence, and is now worth 100 pence. The phrase is also occasionally used for being very careful about unimportant matters and careless about important ones. It was used in this way by Joseph Addison in The Spectator (1712): "A woman who will give up herself to a man in marriage where there is the least Room for such an apprehension ... may very properly be accused ... of being penny wise and pound foolish." [c. 1600]
See also: and, foolish, penny, pound, wise

penny-wise and pound-foolish

mainly BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If someone is penny-wise and pound-foolish, they are very careful about small amounts of money but not careful enough about large amounts. If we had employed a good accountant, we would never have lost the money. In other words, we have been penny-wise and pound-foolish here. We are being penny wise and pound foolish, trying to save a few dollars and hastening the time when we are going to have another accident.
See also: and

penny wise and pound foolish

careful and economical in small matters while being wasteful or extravagant in large ones.
See also: and, foolish, penny, pound, wise

penny ˌwise (and) pound ˈfoolish

used to say that somebody is very careful about small matters but much less sensible about larger, more important things: When it comes to a used car, don’t be penny wise and pound foolish. Spend the money to have the vehicle checked out.
See also: foolish, penny, pound, wise
References in periodicals archive ?
The moral dimension, whether overt or covert, underpins the conclusion--which concerns the fleeting qualities of youth and beauty and the inevitability of death--with the advice to spend time wisely rather than foolishly.
Those of us who are involved with the League understand how voter registration works, and I tend to foolishly assume that everyone knows how to do it, but they, perhaps, choose not to register.
This was an important argument to make at a time when some critics were pronouncing painting dead while others were just as foolishly rhapsodizing over neo-expressionism as proof of painting's renewed vitality.
It's so much easier than sharing anything else, like the $60 worth of overpriced yuppie comestibles I foolishly brought home in that bag.
This is the first step toward financial empowerment because it: helps you "establish where your money is going and ensure you're not foolishly spending it," states Robert Pagan, a financial advisor with Westchester, New York-based Vernon & Associates (www.
Then as later, his opponents underestimated him; Brown foolishly intervened in his primary to try to defeat a moderate GOP rival on the theory that Reagan would be easier to beat.
Anyone who knows or has worked for me will tell you that I don't spend money foolishly.
The highlight of the season was a smart restaging by Anna Markard and Airi Hynninen of Kurt Jooss's 1932 Big City, the simple fable of a young girl, seduced by decadent high society, who foolishly spurns the love of her working-class beau when enticed by the seductive wiles of an affluent libertine and ends up forsaken.
Safire also foolishly assumes that a nonpartisan board of physicians could reach a unanimous opinion about a candidate's health.
SAN DIEGO -- "Tax refund time is here again and Americans are so anxious to get their money back that some will foolishly pay a high fee to get their refund back a couple of days earlier," says Mr.
He tweeted, 'The United States has foolishly given Pakistan more than 33 billion dollars in aid over the last 15 years, and they have given us nothing but lies and deceit, thinking of our leaders as fools.
The US President wrote that they foolishly gave over 33 billion dollars in aid to Pakistan over the past 15 years.
Response to Trump's stance of 'No More' to Pakistan regarding the aid came around an hour after the US president tweeted; 'The United States has foolishly given Pakistan more than 33 billion dollars in aid over the last 15 years.