foolish

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Related to foolishly: speedily, magnificently, immensely, harshly

be penny-wise and dollar-foolish

To be so concerned with saving money in any way possible that one fails to allocate enough money to solve large or important problems, ultimately forcing one to spend more in the long run. I know you don't want to pay for this expensive course of treatment, but when ignoring your health lands you in the hospital and you have to miss work, you'll see that you were penny-wise and dollar-foolish. Don't be penny-wise and dollar-foolish when it comes to home repairs. Saving a few hundred dollars now on shoddy work could cost you several thousand down the line!
See also: and

be penny-wise and pound-foolish

To be so concerned with saving money that one ignores larger problems and ultimately ends up spending more. I know you don't want to pay for this expensive course of treatment, but when ignoring your health lands you in the hospital, you'll see that you were penny-wise and pound-foolish.
See also: and

it's a foolish sheep that makes the wolf his confessor

proverb You should only confide in people you know to be trustworthy. A: "I don't understand why he told Wendy his secret, knowing that she's a real busybody. Of course she blabbed it all over town!" B: "I know. It's a foolish sheep that makes the wolf his confessor."
See also: foolish, make, sheep, that, wolf

penny-wise and dollar-foolish

So concerned with saving money in any way possible that one fails to allocate enough money to solve large or important problems, ultimately forcing one to spend more in the long run. I know you don't want to pay for this expensive course of treatment, but when ignoring your health lands you in the hospital and you have to miss work, you'll see that you were penny-wise and dollar-foolish. Don't let yourself become penny-wise and dollar-foolish when it comes to home repairs. Saving a few hundred dollars now on shoddy work could cost you several thousand down the line!
See also: and

penny-wise and pound-foolish

So concerned with saving money in any way possible that one fails to allocate money to things that will ultimately force one to spend more (due to lack of quality, proper maintenance, etc.). I know you don't want to pay for this expensive course of treatment, but when ignoring your health lands you in the hospital and you have to miss work, you'll see that you were penny-wise and pound-foolish.
See also: and
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

penny-wise and pound-foolish

Prov. thrifty with small sums and foolish with large sums. (Describes someone who will go to a lot of trouble to save a little money, but overlooks large expenses to save a little money. Even in the United States, the reference is to British pounds sterling.) Sam: If we drive to six different grocery stores, we'll get the best bargains on everything we buy. Alan: But with gasoline so expensive, that's penny-wise and pound-foolish.
See also: and
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

penny wise and pound foolish

Stingy about small expenditures and extravagant with large ones, as in Dean clips all the coupons for supermarket bargains but insists on going to the best restaurants-penny wise and pound foolish . This phrase alludes to British currency, in which a pound was once worth 240 pennies, or pence, and is now worth 100 pence. The phrase is also occasionally used for being very careful about unimportant matters and careless about important ones. It was used in this way by Joseph Addison in The Spectator (1712): "A woman who will give up herself to a man in marriage where there is the least Room for such an apprehension ... may very properly be accused ... of being penny wise and pound foolish." [c. 1600]
See also: and, foolish, penny, pound, wise
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

penny-wise and pound-foolish

mainly BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If someone is penny-wise and pound-foolish, they are very careful about small amounts of money but not careful enough about large amounts. If we had employed a good accountant, we would never have lost the money. In other words, we have been penny-wise and pound-foolish here. We are being penny wise and pound foolish, trying to save a few dollars and hastening the time when we are going to have another accident.
See also: and
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

penny wise and pound foolish

careful and economical in small matters while being wasteful or extravagant in large ones.
See also: and, foolish, penny, pound, wise
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

penny ˌwise (and) pound ˈfoolish

used to say that somebody is very careful about small matters but much less sensible about larger, more important things: When it comes to a used car, don’t be penny wise and pound foolish. Spend the money to have the vehicle checked out.
See also: foolish, penny, pound, wise
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

penny wise and pound foolish

Penurious about small expenses and extravagant with large ones. That such a course is to be deplored was already made clear in the sixteenth century and was soon transferred to the foolishness of being fastidious about unimportant matters and careless about important ones. In The Spectator of 1712 Joseph Addison wrote, “I think a Woman who will give up herself to a Man in marriage, where there is the least Room for such an Apprehension . . . may very properly be accused . . . of being Penny Wise and Pound foolish.”
See also: and, foolish, penny, pound, wise
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Q I HOLD a provisional licence and foolishly reversed my car out of my drive unaccompanied to get into my garage and bumped into a vehicle coming round the corner.
During a drink with me and my wife at a bar after the play, Pinter pulled out a Ritz-Carlton notepad and jotted a congratulatory message to the cast "in case they didn't understand my enthusiasm when we went backstage--I wish Edward Albee could see this!" That was the night's lone note, foolishly tacked to the company bulletin board, and promptly stolen!
The Humanist Interview returns in this issue with renowned linguist, skeptic, and social critic Noam Chomsky, who remains consistently (although never foolishly) opinionated on matters of U.S.
She offers him a job as her new buffer, a job offer Hayate foolishly accepts.
Bill Gertz has long been a foreign affairs Cassandra, issuing warnings that the world foolishly ignored.
My own husband is not a cop, but we are both shooters and there is no doubt in my mind we'd make a formidable team if somebody foolishly elected to take us on some day.
Traditional moral philosophers foolishly pursued that which does not exist, absolute truth, and they foolishly insisted on the myth that absolute altruism, totally ignoring our own needs, is a good idea.
I foolishly agreed to go camping once here - I was the only one with a sweater and torch - and it was a night of real LA rains.
These were the things that made us distinctively Catholic and, by today's standards, foolishly Catholic.
Not only was the cornerstone rejected by the builders, but the cornerstone named Jesus rejected another stone forever: the one that foolishly tried to keep him in the grave.
Unfortunately uncertainty gripped me and I foolishly tried to step off going about 15mph, which ended up with my head saying hello to the base of the concrete streetlight.
"He foolishly drove a friend's car after he'd been out in Gosforth."
District Judge Vivian Manning Davies said he was very disturbed that the defendant had 'very foolishly' threatened the officer by text message.
Some of the problem even belongs to the portion of the teaching profession that, unmotivated, taught the town's children simple reading, writing and arithmetic, foolishly abandoning the idea of providing the true inspiration that could lift their charges above a life of merely following preceding generations to the factory at the end of Main Street.
Because the Bush administration foolishly refuses to allocate the money Congress had approved for UNFPA, Lois Abraham and I are asking 34 million Americans to contribute one dollar (see www.34millionfriends.org).