foolish


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be penny-wise and pound-foolish

To be so concerned with saving money that one ignores larger problems and ultimately ends up spending more. I know you don't want to pay for this expensive course of treatment, but when ignoring your health lands you in the hospital, you'll see that you were penny-wise and pound-foolish.
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penny-wise and pound-foolish

So concerned with saving money in any way possible that one fails to allocate money to things that will ultimately force one to spend more (due to lack of quality, proper maintenance, etc). I know you don't want to pay for this expensive course of treatment, but when ignoring your health lands you in the hospital and you have to miss work, you'll see that you were penny-wise and pound-foolish.
See also: and

penny-wise and pound-foolish

Prov. thrifty with small sums and foolish with large sums. (Describes someone who will go to a lot of trouble to save a little money, but overlooks large expenses to save a little money. Even in the United States, the reference is to British pounds sterling.) Sam: If we drive to six different grocery stores, we'll get the best bargains on everything we buy. Alan: But with gasoline so expensive, that's penny-wise and pound-foolish.
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penny wise and pound foolish

Stingy about small expenditures and extravagant with large ones, as in Dean clips all the coupons for supermarket bargains but insists on going to the best restaurants-penny wise and pound foolish . This phrase alludes to British currency, in which a pound was once worth 240 pennies, or pence, and is now worth 100 pence. The phrase is also occasionally used for being very careful about unimportant matters and careless about important ones. It was used in this way by Joseph Addison in The Spectator (1712): "A woman who will give up herself to a man in marriage where there is the least Room for such an apprehension ... may very properly be accused ... of being penny wise and pound foolish." [c. 1600]
See also: and, foolish, penny, pound, wise

penny-wise and pound-foolish

mainly BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If someone is penny-wise and pound-foolish, they are very careful about small amounts of money but not careful enough about large amounts. If we had employed a good accountant, we would never have lost the money. In other words, we have been penny-wise and pound-foolish here. We are being penny wise and pound foolish, trying to save a few dollars and hastening the time when we are going to have another accident.
See also: and

penny wise and pound foolish

careful and economical in small matters while being wasteful or extravagant in large ones.
See also: and, foolish, penny, pound, wise

penny ˌwise (and) pound ˈfoolish

used to say that somebody is very careful about small matters but much less sensible about larger, more important things: When it comes to a used car, don’t be penny wise and pound foolish. Spend the money to have the vehicle checked out.
See also: foolish, penny, pound, wise
References in periodicals archive ?
In Matthew 7, foolish people are the ones who heard Jesus' words and didn't bother to act on them.
In a response published to the stock market, he told the Beales board: "I have long held the view that: 1) It is foolish to upset your landlord.
So here's your takeaway: Be bold, be a bit foolish and just go for it
The story concludes: "But everyone who hears these sayings of Mine and does not do them will be like the foolish man who built his house on the sand: and the rain descended, the floods came and the winds blew and beat on the house and it fell and great was its fall.
SUCH FOOLISH DREAMS Hope That long forgotten word, Seems to awaken, Vague memories of long ago, When the naivety of youth, Allowed such foolish dreams, To flourish.
completely foolish, unreasonable, or untrue : ridiculous <His claims are absurd.
Asked about Mofaz`s comments, Najjar said: "Our armed forces are at the height of their readiness and if anyone should want to undertake such a foolish job the response would be very painful.
Body: storehouse of the infinite, giddy, foolish, forgiven.
It would be foolish to say he's just getting started.
The "law" in a sermon on wisdom is not so much about condemning what is obviously foolish.
Carrying a knife for self defence is foolish because it can turn a drunken brawl into a murder, but it would be foolish to imprison everyone caught carrying a knife.
Then Jesus started telling them that the kingdom of God is like a woman who is so foolish that she tries to hide leaven, the yeast, in bread dough and subsequently leavens the whole batch of dough.
To put it simply: The face of Ghosttown wore a benign, foolish smile and bright eyes--the blank stare of the fully evolved hippie.
Each year, the normally solitary sharks mysteriously converge on the islands to feast on a bounty of seals--and anything else foolish enough to enter the water.
I am sure there are those who will call Howard Zinn naive, foolish, or even a nutcase for advocating against all war.