fool (one or oneself) into (something)

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fool (one or oneself) into (something)

To use deception or trickery to compel someone or oneself to do something. I can't believe that guy fooled me into giving him money—what a scam. The more Lucy tries to fool herself into believing she's happy in her marriage, the more miserable she becomes.
See also: fool
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fool someone into something

to deceive someone or oneself into doing something. You'll never fool me into believing you. We fooled the boss into giving us all the day off.
See also: fool
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
I fooled myself into thinking I'd achieved everything I wanted.
I fooled myself into thinking that I was really just a victim of "someone slipping me a mickey" not someone sexually assaulting me.
I fooled myself into thinKing that I could unsettle him with some hostile questioning.
I fooled myself into thinking Keiren wanted to stay, and surmised that the delay in signing was merely to iron out the formalities of a contract so esoteric that I couldn't hope to understand.
I fooled myself into thinking things would be different when we returned, that the sun might indeed shine on the Bullring.
"I was so wrapped up in the wedding I fooled myself into thinking things were ok.
How had I fooled myself into believing that I would lose enough weight by some miraculous chance and fit into those clothes?
"Although I don't really remember feeling that big, I look back at pictures and think that I must have fooled myself into thinking I looked good."
When I started in this business, I never fooled myself into believing that this would be about just writing books.
"I fooled myself into thinking the characters I played needed to be waifish, but it was really my way of dealing or not dealing with the pressures I was feeling at home and in my career."
It's interesting that for many years, nearly a decade, I fooled myself into thinking that I was just writing about Marie Laveau.
Although I haven't fooled myself into believing I know much more about it, I have changed my outlook and am particularly sensitive to how I react to others.
But at a recent family gathering I fooled myself into thinking I could reset the clock.