Fool


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Aside from April Fools' Day, the custom of setting aside a day for the playing of harmless pranks upon one's neighbour has historically been relatively common in the world.
Much to their amusement, they found alikeness in the writ form of April fool japes and baleful fake stories.
Shoppers will be able to plan their fool hunt by following Argos's Twitter and Instagram feeds, as the high street favourite will post clues on where the fools are being placed in different locations on different days.
Upton joined the list of Fossil Fools today because, like them, he has made his allegiance to corporate polluters clear by voting repeatedly against climate action, clean air and water protections.
The Motley Fool is one of the very few large brands with the same voice skill delivered on all of the three Voice First platforms: Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, and now Microsoft Cortana.
So, pay attention to what your friends or family say to you today, as you could be about to be fooled!
Now it has become as tradition that playful and jolly persons exploit the 1st April to make people fool. In some countries including United Kingdom, New Zealand and South Africa, the joyful occasion of April fool is celebrated from morning to afternoon and after that the sequence of making fool is stopped.
Libby said: "The first song has a sort of Motown beat and ends with the words 'A Seven Day Fool' - then I follow straight into Mumma Said, for which the opening words are 'I've been a fool'."
Penn: Teller is a great magician and fools me all the time.
'A man may be a fool and not know it, but not if he's married' H.
BRUCE Lee said: "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer" and he knew more than his movies let on so before you give someone the chop ask your questions even if they sound silly to you.
Although the title implies a comprehensive approach to English clowning, the book is concerned primarily with the specific instances of clowns operating as "religio-political" satirists, more specifically: the use of blackface fools, the adoption of traditions of misrule by religious propagandists, the puritan as clown in pamphlet satire and on the stage, and the royal fool as evinced by the two editions of Shakespeare's King Lear.
that's villainous, and shows a most pitiful ambition in the fool
This rich study presents a thoughtful and extended discussion of the popular theme of the Fool, and specifically, the Fool traveling, that were represented in Northern Renaissance woodcuts and other types of prints, with detailed discussion of the origins and symbolism of their iconography.
4 : to play with or handle something carelessly <Don't fool with my science project.>