food desert

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food desert

A location that lack options for nutritious food. The phrase is often associated with urban areas with stores that mostly offer non-perishable food. Good luck finding fresh vegetables around here—this part of the city is a real food desert.
See also: desert, food
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Essentially, the food deserts concept links supply of nutritious food, and the availability of food outlets providing it, to the cost low-income consumers face in obtaining it.
The store is one of more than a dozen Walgreens outlets in Chicago neighborhoods that are identified as food deserts.
These areas are known as "food deserts" and helping to shrink them is a goal of the Healthy Food Finance Initiative, an effort of U.S.
Food deserts are impoverished areas with no grocery stores for as far as the eye can see.
Areas where residents have limited access to affordable nutritious food--known as "food deserts"--have been named as a possible factor in the rise in U.S.
While other climate research predicts drier climates and the emergence of food deserts, Hubbart's research indicates quite the opposite.
Some individuals have serious economic barriers; some live in "kosher food deserts," where there is an extremely limited supply of kosher food and high prices; some have limited mobility and require food delivery, or have some combination of all these challenges.
The Grocery Access Program, which offers $2.50 shared Lyft rides, is expanding to Atlantic City and other food deserts around the countryto minimize barriers to healthy food through better transportation options.
That logistical legwork provides the consistency and volume that grocers need to be able to satisfactorily serve their customers, and it gets more fresh food into cafeterias, stores, and schools--where most people shop and eat--in underserved communities and food deserts. Food hubs can thus become a crucial piece of a food-supply chain, enabling farmers to scale up, and supplying consumers with a wider range of regional options--all of which supports local economies and reduces the costs and carbon emissions associated with shipping.
They discuss the problem of hunger or food insecurity in a broader theoretical and global context; the social and demographic elements of food insecurity; the consequences of food insecurity for physical and mental health; whether food deserts are the source of the problem; why people cannot be expected to solve their own food insecurities, and the problems with community gardens, farmers' markets, food banks and pantries, and other elements of the alternative food movement; problems of access and participation in public policy focusing on food insecurity, particularly Meals on Wheels, the school breakfast and lunch program for low-income children, and SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); and the world food supply in the 21st century.
Shimano founded the food computer program to help Baltimore public school students understand how they can use technology to design solutions for community challenges, such as food deserts.
The project is an initiative of the university's Sustainable and Urban Agriculture Cooperative Extension Program and a part of Sabras Plants with a Purpose program, which addresses the needs of communities living in food deserts.
A new guide can help communities across the nation replicate a successful Washington, D.C., program that brings healthy food access to local food deserts.
In an effort to target policy and planning decisions geared toward improving healthy food access, most studies have focused on the prevalence of "food deserts".