fond of


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Related to fond of: keen on

*fond of someone or something

liking someone or something. (*Typically: be ~; become ~.) I'm fond of chocolate. Mary isn't fond of me, but I'm fond of her.
See also: of
References in classic literature ?
Besides the service and society, Vronsky had another great interest--horses; he was passionately fond of horses.
I must own that we found it far prettier than anything we had known in Southern Ohio, which we were so fond of and so loath to leave, and as I look back it still seems to me one of the prettiest little places I have ever known, with its white wooden houses, glimmering in the dark of its elms and maples, and their silent gardens beside each, and the silent, grass- bordered, sandy streets between them.
If I were her ghost--my father would be fond of me.
I believe he's quite fond of you, Philip," smiled Mildred.
I think it's so nice of him to be so fond of you, Philip.
Allen, who owned the chief of the property about Fullerton, the village in Wiltshire where the Morlands lived, was ordered to Bath for the benefit of a gouty constitution -- and his lady, a good-humoured woman, fond of Miss Morland, and probably aware that if adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad, invited her to go with them.
Dear me, Dorothea, I suppose it would be right for you to be fond of a man whom you accepted for a husband.
It is offensive to me to say that Sir James could think I was fond of him.
And all day long, as he kept unwinking watch on the slow process which promised to protract itself through many days and weeks, whenever (to save himself from being choked with dust) he patrolled a little cinderous beat he established for the purpose, without taking his eyes from the diggers, he still stumped to the tune: He's GROWN too FOND of MONEY for THAT, he's GROWN too FOND of MONEY.
Flesh and blood and temper," he said; "he's too fond of his own will, and that won't suit me.
Dolokhov lay ill at his mother's who loved him passionately and tenderly, and old Mary Ivanovna, who had grown fond of Rostov for his friendship to her Fedya, often talked to him about her son.
He patted Button-Bright's curly head tenderly, for he was fond of children, and turned to the shaggy man and shook both his hands at the same time.
I'm afraid you ain't fond of Miss Polly," he grinned.
He had been too fond of his cousin to like to confess this to himself, until the truth had been forced on him, when she drove off to her aunt's.
Martin's saying as she was so fond of it, it should be called her cow; and of their having a very handsome summerhouse in their garden, where some day next year they were all to drink tea: a very handsome summerhouse, large enough to hold a dozen people.