following


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cult following

Collectively, the passionate fans of a film, TV show, book, or other creative work, typically one that has not had mainstream success. How did "Twin Peaks" manage to create a cult following in just two seasons?
See also: cult, following

follow (one's) lead

To act in a manner similar to someone else. I know you're nervous about having to lie to Mom, but just follow my lead and don't start rambling. I am following my sister's lead and joining her old sorority.
See also: follow, lead

follow (one's) nose

1. To walk straight ahead (thus walking in the direction that one's nose is facing). A: "Should I turn here?" B: "No, follow your nose and keep walking in a straight line—you'll be at my house soon enough."
2. To follow a scent, in an attempt to find its source. I thought I smelled something baking, so I followed my nose down to the kitchen and found my mom icing a cake!
3. To trust one's instinct when making a judgment or decision or taking action. I tend to follow my nose when I have a bad feeling about someone, and it's helped me to avoid a lot of drama.
See also: follow, nose

follow (someone or something) about

To move or follow close behind someone or something, often in an annoying way. I'm a preschool teacher, so I've had toddlers following me about all day. The interior designer can't get any work done with your puppy constantly following her about!
See also: follow

follow (someone or something) around

To move or follow close behind someone or something, often in an annoying way. I'm a preschool teacher, so I've had toddlers following me around all day. The interior designer can't get any work done with your puppy constantly following her around!
See also: around, follow

follow (someone or something) in stride

To follow the direction, lead, or guidance (of someone or something); to act in accordance (with someone or something); to follow suit. I hope your little sister doesn't follow your bad behavior in stride. If you can develop a really strong social presence for your company, then your sales will follow in stride. I really hope the new president doesn't follow his predecessor in stride.
See also: follow, stride

follow a middle course

To compromise between two extreme or polarizing alternatives; to find a solution, policy, or course of action that is acceptable or agreeable to two different or opposing sides. The small sovereign nation has gotten along for years by following a middle course between the two global superpowers on either sides of its border. The president's popularity among the more extreme members of his party was diminished by his attempts to follow a middle course with some bipartisan policies.
See also: course, follow, middle

follow along

1. To do something as others do it. I have no idea how to get out of the stadium, so I'm just following along with the mass of people.
2. To trail closely behind someone or something. When you have a toddler, you can always count on them following along with anything you try to do around the house.
3. To monitor something in order to keep pace with what someone else is doing. I couldn't quite hear what the actors were saying, so I followed along with the closed captions.
See also: follow

follow in (one's) footsteps

To pursue something that someone else (often a family member) has already done. My father was an engineer, and I plan to follow in his footsteps and study engineering in college. I am following in my sister's footsteps and joining her old sorority.
See also: follow, footstep

follow in (one's) tracks

To pursue something that someone else (often a family member) has already done. My father was an engineer, and I plan to follow in his tracks and study engineering in college. I am following in my sister's tracks and joining her old sorority.
See also: follow, track

follow in the footsteps of

To pursue something that someone else (often a family member) has already done. I plan to follow in the footsteps of my father and study engineering in college. We are following in the footsteps of all the members of the sorority that came before us!
See also: follow, footstep, of

follow on

1. verb To leave for a destination after someone else has already done so. You guys go ahead—I'll follow on when I'm done cleaning up here.
2. verb To die after someone else has already died. Grandpa died first, and Grandma followed on about six months later.
3. noun Something that comes after something else and builds upon it. The phrase is typically hyphenated when used as a noun. This is just a follow-on to our conversation yesterday, to make sure we share the same vision for the décor. French III has to be a follow-on of French II, right?
See also: follow, on

follow on after (someone or something)

1. To leave for a destination after someone else has already done so. I still have to finish cleaning up here, so you guys go on ahead, and I'll follow on after you.
2. To die after someone else has already died. Grandpa died first, and Grandma followed on after him about six month later.
See also: after, follow, on

follow orders

To act in accordance with the instructions that one has been given. Ma'am, I'm not trying to be rude, I'm just following orders from my superior—we need to search this property.
See also: follow, order

follow out

1. To trail closely behind someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "follow" and "out." Make sure the cat doesn't follow you out of the house.
2. To do or accomplish something. If you don't follow out every step exactly the way I showed you, then the experiment won't work.
See also: follow, out

follow suit

To do the same thing as others, especially by following their example. The phrase comes from card games, where there are four "suits" (diamonds, hearts, spades, and clubs). The people in front of us began to file out of the auditorium, and we followed suit. After that studio made that hit musical, plenty of others tried to follow suit.
See also: follow, suit

follow the crowd

To do what everyone else is doing. This phrase often has a negative connotation, suggesting that the speaker is not an independent thinker or is easily swayed. I'm worried that my daughter will just follow the crowd at the party and end up doing things that she doesn't really want to do.
See also: crowd, follow

follow the example of

To do something that another person is doing. Growing up, I really tried not to follow the example of my older brother, as he was always getting into trouble. I try to follow the example of Mother Teresa and treat all people with kindness.
See also: example, follow, of

follow the sea

To be a sailor; to live a sailor's life. I always assumed that I would follow the sea, like all of the men in my family, but I just didn't have the constitution for that life.
See also: follow, sea

follow through

1. verb To engage in an action or complete some task that one said or implied one would do. If you told her you'd help her move, then you need to follow through. The customer service guy said he would send me an email, and he actually followed through and did it.
2. verb In sports, to fully complete a motion or stroke (such as when shooting a basketball or swinging a golf club, for example). You didn't follow through with your swing—that's why the ball didn't travel farther.
3. noun In sports, the full completion of a motion or stroke (such as when shooting a basketball or swinging a golf club, for example). You need to work on your follow through if you want the ball to travel farther.
See also: follow, through

follow through on (something)

1. To engage in an action or complete some task that one said or implied one would do. If you told her you'd help her move, then you need to follow through on it. His problem is that he never follows through on all his ambitious plans.
2. In sports, to fully complete a motion or stroke (such as when shooting a basketball or swinging a golf club, for example). You didn't follow through on your swing—that's why the ball didn't travel farther.
See also: follow, on, through

follow through with (something)

1. To engage in an action or complete some task that one said or implied one would do. If you told her you'd help her move, then you need to follow through with it. His problem is that he never follows through with all his ambitious plans.
2. In sports, to fully complete a motion or stroke (such as when shooting a basketball or swinging a golf club, for example). You didn't follow through with your swing—that's why the ball didn't travel farther.
See also: follow, through

follow up

1. verb To contact someone an additional time to get more information about something. Please follow up with Ingrid to be sure that the project is still on schedule. The doctor's office never called me back, so I'm going to follow up with them tomorrow.
2. verb To follow an action or event with another action or event. We followed up the doctor's appointment with a trip to the ice cream parlor, as promised.
3. verb To check that something was done properly. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "follow" and "up." Ben never follows the instructions I give him, so can you please follow up to make sure he does?
4. noun A subsequent appointment, usually with a doctor for the purpose of monitoring something. In this usage, the phrase is often hyphenated. Apparently, my cholesterol levels were a little high, so I have to go back for a follow-up next month.
See also: follow, up

follow up on (something)

1. To contact someone again or at a later time to get more information about something. Is the project is still on schedule? Please follow up on this with Ingrid to be sure. The doctor's office never called me back, so I'm going to follow up on that tomorrow.
2. To check that something was done properly. Ben never follows the instructions I give him, so can you please follow up on his assignment?
See also: follow, on, up

follow on

 (after someone or something)
1. Lit. to depart and arrive after someone or something. I can't leave now. I will have to follow on after the others. I will follow on later.
2. Fig. to die at a date later than someone or a group. She followed on after her husband a few years later, He died in June and she followed on in August.
See also: follow, on

follow orders

to do as one has been instructed. You have to learn to follow orders if you want to be a Marine. I didn't do anything wrong. I was only following orders.
See also: follow, order

follow someone or something out

to go out right after someone or something. I followed her out and asked her if I could take her home. The dog followed Billy out and went to school with him.
See also: follow, out

follow someone up

 and follow up (on someone)
to check on the work that someone has done. I have to follow Sally up and make sure she did everything right. I follow up Sally, checking on her work. I'll follow up on her.
See also: follow, up

follow something up

 and follow up (on something)
1. to check something out; to find out more about something. Would you please follow this lead up? It might be important. Please follow up this lead. I'll follow up on it. Yes, please follow up.
2. to make sure that something was done the way it was intended. Please follow this up. I want it done right. Please follow up this business. I'll follow up on it.
See also: follow, up

follow suit

to follow in the same pattern; to follow someone else's example. (From card games.) Mary went to work for a bank, and Jane followed suit. Now they are both head cashiers. The Smiths went out to dinner, but the Browns didn't follow suit. They stayed home.
See also: follow, suit

follow the crowd

to do what everyone else is doing. I am an independent thinker. I could never just follow the crowd. When in doubt, I follow the crowd. At least I don't stand out like a fool.
See also: crowd, follow

follow through

(on something) and carry through (on something) to complete a task; to see a task through to its completion. You must follow through on the things that you start. Don't start the job if you can't follow through. Ask Sally to carry through on her project.
See also: follow, through

follow through (with something)

 and follow something through
to complete an activity, doing what was promised. I wish you would follow through with the project we talked about. You never follow through!
See also: follow, through

follow up

(on someone) Go to follow someone up.
See also: follow, up

follow up

(on someone or something) to find out more about someone or something. Please follow up on Mr. Brown and his activities. Bill, Mr. Smith has a complaint. Would you please follow up on it?
See also: follow, up

follow up

(on something) Go to follow something up.
See also: follow, up

follow along

Move or proceed in accord or in unison with someone. For example, The children followed along with the song, or They followed along with the crowd.
See also: follow

follow out

Bring to a conclusion, carry out. For example, The second volume simply followed out the theories presented in the first, or He instructed them to follow out their orders to the letter. This idiom is dying out. [Mid-1700s]
See also: follow, out

follow suit

Imitate or do as someone else has done, as in Bill decided to leave for the rest of the day, and Mary followed suit. This term comes from card games in which one must play a card from the same suit as the one led. [Mid-1800s]
See also: follow, suit

follow the crowd

Go along with the majority, do what most others are doing. For example, Make your own decision-don't just follow the crowd.
See also: crowd, follow

follow through

1. In sports such as tennis or golf, carry a stroke to completion after striking the ball. For example, You don't follow through on your backhand, so it goes into the net. [Late 1800s]
2. Carry an object, project, or intention to completion; pursue fully. For example, She followed through on her promise to reorganize the department. Also see follow up, def. 1.
See also: follow, through

follow up

1. Carry to completion. For example, I'm following up their suggestions with concrete proposals. Also see follow through.
2. Increase the effectiveness or enhance the success of something by further action. For example, She followed up her interview with a phone call. [Late 1700s]
See also: follow, up

follow suit

COMMON If someone follows suit, they do the same thing that someone else has just done. Note: The following expressions refer to the four suits in a pack of cards: diamonds, hearts, clubs, and spades. The company provides childcare for the children of staff members. If only other employers would follow suit. If Tim had a stack of pancakes for breakfast, Emily would follow suit. Note: If you follow suit in a card game, you play a card of the same suit as the previous player.
See also: follow, suit

follow suit

1 (in bridge, whist, and other card games) play a card of the suit led. 2 conform to another's actions.
2 2002 History of Scotland The first Earl of Huntly was a Gordon by adoption. Many other lesser men followed suit, assuming the surname of so successful a family.
See also: follow, suit

follow ˈsuit

act or behave in the way that somebody else has just done: One of the oil companies put up the price of fuel today, and the others are expected to follow suit.
If you follow suit in card games, you play a card of the same suit (= either hearts, clubs, diamonds or spades) that has just been played.
See also: follow, suit

follow along

v.
1. To accompany by following: I went for a walk in the woods, and my cats followed along. Our guide led the hike and we followed him along.
2. To move or act in conjunction with an activity by following an example: The teacher sang and the children followed along.
3. To move or act in conjunction or in parallel with someone or something: I followed along with the speaker by reading the transcript.
See also: follow

follow out

v.
1. To fulfill something, especially a command or request; carry something out: The colonel expected the troops to follow out every order without question.
2. To exit a location by following someone or something: The fans followed the movie star out of the studio.
See also: follow, out

follow through

v.
1. To complete fully something that has been planned or is in process: She passed the remaining work on to him, but he didn't follow through right away. I followed through on the report and finished it the next day.
2. Sports To complete a stroke or swing fully after hitting or releasing a ball or other object: My tennis instructor taught me how to follow through after I served the ball. When you're batting, don't forget to follow through on your swing.
See also: follow, through

follow up

v.
1. To finish something by means of some final action: They followed the performance up with a stunning encore. The writer followed up his first book with a great sequel.
2. follow up on To enhance the effectiveness of something by means of further action: I followed up on the job interview with an email. Did you follow up on their request?
See also: follow, up

follow suit

1. Games To play a card of the same suit as the one led.
2. To do as another has done; follow an example.
See also: follow, suit
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