follow up

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follow up

1. verb To contact someone an additional time to get more information about something. Please follow up with Ingrid to be sure that the project is still on schedule. The doctor's office never called me back, so I'm going to follow up with them tomorrow.
2. verb To follow an action or event with another action or event. We followed up the doctor's appointment with a trip to the ice cream parlor, as promised.
3. verb To check that something was done properly. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "follow" and "up." Ben never follows the instructions I give him, so can you please follow up to make sure he does?
4. noun A subsequent appointment, usually with a doctor for the purpose of monitoring something. In this usage, the phrase is often hyphenated. Apparently, my cholesterol levels were a little high, so I have to go back for a follow-up next month.
See also: follow, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

follow someone up

 and follow up (on someone)
to check on the work that someone has done. I have to follow Sally up and make sure she did everything right. I follow up Sally, checking on her work. I'll follow up on her.
See also: follow, up

follow something up

 and follow up (on something)
1. to check something out; to find out more about something. Would you please follow this lead up? It might be important. Please follow up this lead. I'll follow up on it. Yes, please follow up.
2. to make sure that something was done the way it was intended. Please follow this up. I want it done right. Please follow up this business. I'll follow up on it.
See also: follow, up

follow up

(on someone or something) to find out more about someone or something. Please follow up on Mr. Brown and his activities. Bill, Mr. Smith has a complaint. Would you please follow up on it?
See also: follow, up

follow up

(on someone) Go to follow someone up.
See also: follow, up

follow up

(on something) Go to follow something up.
See also: follow, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

follow up

1. Carry to completion. For example, I'm following up their suggestions with concrete proposals. Also see follow through.
2. Increase the effectiveness or enhance the success of something by further action. For example, She followed up her interview with a phone call. [Late 1700s]
See also: follow, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

follow up

v.
1. To finish something by means of some final action: They followed the performance up with a stunning encore. The writer followed up his first book with a great sequel.
2. follow up on To enhance the effectiveness of something by means of further action: I followed up on the job interview with an email. Did you follow up on their request?
See also: follow, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
No pneumothorax or difficulty on lead operating occurred in the operation and no subclavian crush syndrome occurred in the follow-ups, which confirmed the efficacy and safety of this technique.
First, of the 437 patients, 169 patients (38.7%) were not included because of insufficient US follow-ups. Further, only patients who underwent lobectomy because of PTMC were included; thus, a selection bias was possible.
"We followed up these cases for 5 to 10 years and now they no longer need to visit us regularly for any further follow-ups."
Six sequels are follow-ups to originals that were only released last year, signalling the determination of studios to strike while the iron is hot.
Videotaped treatment sessions were used in conjunction with 1-mo, 1-yr, and 8-yr follow-ups to analyze a case study of hypnotic treatment for pain and neuromuscular rehabilitation in a 30-yr-old female with multiple sclerosis (MS).
System focus is on clinical care delivery, and it allows physicians to enter myriad information, including all notes and codes needed to submit the bill, any future follow-ups, required labs and prescriptions sent to the pharmacy.
Additional strategies may boost compliance in clinical practice, eg, face-to-face or telephone follow-ups or email reminders.
The Trianz-Vee JV will offer BPO services primarily in financial accounting and transaction processing, specialising in AR, AP, Credit, Collections, Time & Expense Management, Bank Reconciliations, Customer/Vendor follow-ups and GL Maintenance.
A final section features a FAQ on Lyme borreliosis and defines protocols for treatment, Western Blot interpretations and seriological follow-ups.
Debate surrounds decisions over whether patients should be put forward for follow-ups or referred straightaway for a colposcopy to carry out a more detailed investigation.
Debate surrounds whether patients should receive regular follow-ups or be referred straightaway for a colposcopy to carry out a more detailed investigation.
(1) Of the 1,947 participants who were followed for up to a year after IUD insertion, 9% reported experiencing serious pain within the first nine weeks of use; after accounting for women who had had their IUD removed before the end of the study period, smaller proportions of women reported pain during subsequent follow-ups: four percent from nine to 19 weeks, 7% from 19 to 39 weeks and 5% after 39 weeks.
This Year 1 Interim report represents initial baseline data from the 2007-08 school year, plus some limited spring 2008 follow-ups. The baseline data included educator surveys, student surveys, point-of-contact surveys, site visitations, and observations from the provincial community of practice and summer events.
Researchers did a number of follow-ups during the children's first year, and again at 30 months, 8 to 12 years, and, most recently, 13 to 18 years.