follow suit


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Related to follow suit: defer to, catch up, pay heed, holding up

follow suit

To do the same thing as others, especially by following their example. The phrase comes from card games, where there are four "suits" (diamonds, hearts, spades, and clubs). The people in front of us began to file out of the auditorium, and we followed suit. After that studio made that hit musical, plenty of others tried to follow suit.
See also: follow, suit
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

follow suit

to follow in the same pattern; to follow someone else's example. (From card games.) Mary went to work for a bank, and Jane followed suit. Now they are both head cashiers. The Smiths went out to dinner, but the Browns didn't follow suit. They stayed home.
See also: follow, suit
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

follow suit

Imitate or do as someone else has done, as in Bill decided to leave for the rest of the day, and Mary followed suit. This term comes from card games in which one must play a card from the same suit as the one led. [Mid-1800s]
See also: follow, suit
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

follow suit

COMMON If someone follows suit, they do the same thing that someone else has just done. Note: The following expressions refer to the four suits in a pack of cards: diamonds, hearts, clubs, and spades. The company provides childcare for the children of staff members. If only other employers would follow suit. If Tim had a stack of pancakes for breakfast, Emily would follow suit. Note: If you follow suit in a card game, you play a card of the same suit as the previous player.
See also: follow, suit
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

follow suit

1 (in bridge, whist, and other card games) play a card of the suit led. 2 conform to another's actions.
2 2002 History of Scotland The first Earl of Huntly was a Gordon by adoption. Many other lesser men followed suit, assuming the surname of so successful a family.
See also: follow, suit
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

follow ˈsuit

act or behave in the way that somebody else has just done: One of the oil companies put up the price of fuel today, and the others are expected to follow suit.
If you follow suit in card games, you play a card of the same suit (= either hearts, clubs, diamonds or spades) that has just been played.
See also: follow, suit
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

follow suit

1. Games To play a card of the same suit as the one led.
2. To do as another has done; follow an example.
See also: follow, suit
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

follow suit, to

To imitate someone; to follow someone’s example. The expression comes from card games such as whist or bridge, in which one must play a card of the same suit as that which was led. The practice was literally spelled out in Cotton’s Complete Gamester (1680), but had obviously been transferred by the time Herman Melville used the expression (Moby-Dick, 1851): “I quickly followed suit and descending into the bar-room accosted the grinning landlord.”
See also: follow
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Celtic Tiger is not a myth--it is a reality, and the results (including job, economic development, and tax revenues) have prompted Ireland's neighbors to follow suit, with Germany and Spain being the most recent countries to announce significant reductions and The Netherlands signaling the intention to follow suit.
The courts of jurisdictions other than California could soon follow suit.
Other major beer producers are due to follow suit. Dr Paul Hegarty of Coors says: "There will be no need to drink warm beer ever again."
Now if only Dunkin' Donuts would follow suit. The company claims to serve one billion cups of coffee a year, or about 2.7 million cups a day.
Essar Steel may follow suit, according to the Economic Times.
Will Durst is a comic who believes that since Major League Baseball returned to the nation's capital after an absence of thirty-four years, it's about time for scruples, ethics, and a sense of duty to follow suit.
And honestly, Nagel acknowledges, he thought every company soon would follow suit. "We took a reading of the tea leaves and thought this was the way the world was headed," he says.
In the 1970s Gelsey Kirkland rebelled by studying ballet with Maggie Black, prompting some of the other New York City Ballet dancers to follow suit. Black, a no-nonsense teacher whose voice combines ah impenetrable Rhode Island accent with the volume of a New England foghorn, possessed an eagle eye for correcting placement and pushing dancers to move organically--and she got extraordinary results from dancers of all stripes.
According to Aegis's Clark, a basic inspiration for the program has been the growth in respect and acceptance for customer-centered best practices in successful companies outside long-term care--the Nordstroms, Starbucks, Disneys, and Ritz-Carltons of the world--and the readiness of long-term care to follow suit.
No longer standing tall among the rest of the world diplomatically and economically, have we unconsciously decided to physically follow suit? (Anti-immigrants might be tempted to blame the height gap on recent Latino and Asian immigrants, however, these groups were excluded from U.S.
Do parents who became myopic because of heavy reading create an environment that encourages their kids to follow suit, she asks.
Did only a few leading institutions, such as Bologna and Padua, make changes, or did the smaller universities follow suit? What did universities accomplish or fail to do during the Renaissance?" (xvi) These are the questions Grendler seeks to answer.
New York and Rhode Island have recently made their constitutions "gender neutral"--substituting neutral, terms or "he or she" for "he." Other states may follow suit. While some contend that the changes are legally unnecessary, others say that argument misses the point.