folks


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(home) folks

Rur. one's family, especially one's parents. It sure is good to see the home folks again. Sally went to visit her folks.
See also: folk

folks

n. one’s parents. (Always with the possessive.) I’ll have to ask my folks if I can go.
See also: folk
References in classic literature ?
and my head went working like a mill, for I was allays uncommon for turning things over and seeing all round 'em; and I says to myself, "Is't the meanin' or the words as makes folks fast i' wedlock?
Aye, and there's few folks know so well as you how it come to be Charity Land, eh, Mr.
Why, they're stables four times as big as Squire Cass's, for he thought o' nothing but hosses and hunting, Cliff didn't--a Lunnon tailor, some folks said, as had gone mad wi' cheating.
Aye, but there's more going on in the stables than what folks see by daylight, eh, Mr.
That's what my father told me, and he was a reasonable man, though there's folks nowadays know what happened afore they were born better nor they know their own business.
Folks as believe in Cliff's Holiday aren't agoing to ventur near it for a matter o' ten pound.
There's folks, i' my opinion, they can't see ghos'es, not if they stood as plain as a pike-staff before 'em.
George, the country folk used to tell me--killed a dragon.
Well, Farringdon is where he lived, before he went to sea; his real name was Hamden Pye, and the Pyes were the great folk at Farringdon.
The black death is the best friend that ever the common folk had in England.
When half the folk in the country were dead it was then that the other half could pick and choose who they would work for, and for what wage.
There is no great harm in that," remarked the tooth-drawer, "for the sheep give many folk their living.
When your folks was waitin' for the railroad to be built an' all the Indians killed off before they dasted to start for California," was Billy's way of proclaiming the new alliance.
And while he did this, taking no notice of me, the Folk crowded at the cave-mouths and watched.
It was a great joke--at least in that day; and right heartily the Folk appreciated it.