foist

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foist (someone or something) off

To force or impose something unwanted or worthless on one. Why are you trying to foist all of these old hats off? You're cleaning out your attic, aren't you? With Hollywood always foisting garbage off, it's a breath of fresh air when a quality film appears in theaters.
See also: foist, off

foist (something) (up)on (one)

To force or impose something unwanted or worthless on one. Why are you trying to foist all of these old hats on me? You're cleaning out your attic, aren't you? With Hollywood always foisting garbage upon us, it's a breath of fresh air when a quality film appears in theaters.
See also: foist

foist off on (one)

To force or impose something unwanted or worthless on one. A noun or pronoun can be used between "foist" and "off." Why are you trying to foist all of these old hats off on me? You're cleaning out your attic, aren't you? With Hollywood always foisting garbage off on us, it's a breath of fresh air when a quality film appears in theaters.
See also: foist, off, on

foist someone or something off (on someone or something)

to cast someone or something unwanted off on someone or a group. Please don't try to foist cheap merchandise off on me. Don't foist off your brother on me! You can't foist that stuff off! It's worthless! People won't buy it!
See also: foist, off

foist off on

v.
To force something, especially something unwanted, worthless, or false, on someone: She foisted off the furniture on the new owners. The peddler foisted his wares off on the unsuspecting crowd.
See also: foist, off, on
References in periodicals archive ?
A Country Gentleman comming downe Westward by water to London, vpon the day when my Lord Maiors Galley Foist was in all her holliday attire, and seeing such triumphing on the Theames, but not knowing the cause, demanded of his Waterman why there was such drumming and piping, and trumpetting, and wherefore all those Barges (like so many Water-pageants) were caryed vp and downe so gaylie with Flags and Streamers?
Ther's an old Lawyer, Trim'd up like a Gally Foist. (5.2.23-4)
there's a Pinnace (Was mann'd out first by th'City,) is come to th'Court, New rigg'd, a very painted Gally foist, And yet our Spanish Caruils, the Armada Or our great vessels dare not stirre for her.
galley-foist: a foist, galley, pinnace or other light vessel propelled by both oars and sail; in the sixteenth and first half of the seventeenth centuries, almost exclusively applied to such a vessel taken upstream of London Bridge and rigged to resemble a square-rigged ship of war which then acted as a highly decorated escort, with gunfire, fireworks, and loud music, for the lord mayor's barge on the day he went by water to take his oath at Westminster.
(7) See OED under 'barge', 'brigantine', 'foist', 'galley', 'galley-foist', and 'pinnace'; also A.
Reference to yards and tops implies masts, so the bachelors' barge must have been given masts and rigging to look like a ship (thus, presumably, resembling the foist).
Anne Lancashire's discussion of this event in terms of three vessels, 'bachelors' barge, wafter, and foist' (English Civic Theatre, 149), may cause confusion, as it follows her quotation from Hall of the instructions before the event for a 'wafter and a foyst'.
Hall's description makes very clear how different the function and appearance of the bachelor's barge and the wafter foist were from the lord mayor's barge, the livery company barges, and the queen's barge which they eventually accompanied from Greenwich to the Tower.
In other words, the foist was already the distinctive 'pleasure on the water'
OED misleadingly uses this passage to support a definition of 'foist' as meaning 'a barge, a small boat used on the river'.