fog

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Related to fogs: fog lights

able to fog a mirror

Alive, perhaps barely. (If one holds up a mirror to one's nose or mouth, the breath will cause fog to appear.) I spent the whole day moving furniture, so I'm barely able to fog a mirror now. He'll date any woman who's able to fog a mirror.
See also: able, fog, mirror

in a fog

Not fully aware or alert; having one's attention clouded with something. I always feel like I'm in a fog when I take that medication. It's like it's hard for me to think.
See also: fog

fog in

1. To cover someone or something with fog. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fog" and "in." As we climbed higher in elevation, the trees were increasingly fogged in.
2. To be forced to stay in a particular place because the outside environment is too foggy. We'll have to fly out tomorrow because today's flight is fogged in.
See also: fog

fog up

1. To become covered in a layer of fog. My glasses fogged up as soon as I stepped out of the ice rink into the August humidity.
2. To cause something to become covered in a layer of fog. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fog" and "up." I breathed on the mirror to fog it up.
3. To become emotional and nearly cry over something. Yes, I fogged up during the graduation ceremony—"Pomp and Circumstance" gets me every time.
See also: fog, up

fog over

To become obscured by fog. My glasses fogged over while I was in the shower—I can't see a thing!
See also: fog, over

able to fog a mirror

Fig. Inf. alive, even if just barely. (Usually jocular. Alludes to the use of a small mirror placed under the nose to tell if a person is breathing or not. (Able to can be replaced with can.) Look, I don't need an athlete to do this job! Anybody able to fog a mirror will do fine!
See also: able, fog, mirror

fog over

[for something made of glass] to become covered over with water vapor. The windshield fogged over because I forgot to turn on the defroster. The mirror fogged over, and I couldn't see to shave.
See also: fog, over

fog something up

to make something made of glass become covered with a film of water vapor. The moisture fogged the windshield up, and we had to stop to clean it off. The moisture fogged up the glass.
See also: fog, up

fog up

[for something made of glass] to become partially or completely obscured by a film of water vapor. The glass fogged up, and we couldn't see out.
See also: fog, up

in a fog

 and in a haze
Fig. dazed; not paying attention to what is going on around one; not alert. Jane always seems to be in a fog. When I get up, I'm in a fog for an hour. After surgery, I was in a haze until the anesthetic wore off.
See also: fog

in a fog

Also, in a haze. Preoccupied, not paying attention; also, at a loss, confused. For example, After the accident he went about in a fog, even though he had not been injured, or Millie always seems to be in a haze; she never knows what's going on. These expressions allude to fog or haze obscuring one's view; the fog usage dates from about 1600, haze from about 1800.
See also: fog

in a fog

in a state of perplexity; unable to think clearly or understand something.
See also: fog

in a ˈfog

(informal) uncertain and confused: Thank you for your explanation, but I’m afraid I’m still in a fog over what happened.
See also: fog

fog in

v.
1. To surround something with fog: The descending mists fogged in the little village. The storm clouds fogged us in on the mountaintop. Because the airport was fogged in, all of the flights were canceled.
2. To cause something to be unable to move safely due to fog. Used chiefly in the passive: The airplane was fogged in and could not land.
See also: fog

fog up

v.
1. To become covered with condensation: The bathroom mirror fogged up after I took a shower.
2. To cause something to become covered with condensation: The steam from the kettle fogged up the kitchen windows. Don't breathe on the lens—you'll fog it up.
3. To become teary-eyed out of a strong sense of emotion: I fogged up when my parents' photo was unveiled.
See also: fog, up
References in classic literature ?
I felt quite amused at his unwarranted choler, and while he stumped indignantly up and down I fell to dwelling upon the romance of the fog. And romantic it certainly was--the fog, like the grey shadow of infinite mystery, brooding over the whirling speck of earth; and men, mere motes of light and sparkle, cursed with an insane relish for work, riding their steeds of wood and steel through the heart of the mystery, groping their way blindly through the Unseen, and clamouring and clanging in confident speech the while their hearts are heavy with incertitude and fear.
As the fog had been the proximate cause of this sumptuous repast, so the fog served for its general sauce.
"Who that once bends from the line of his march in a fog can tell when or how to find it again!
Suddenly a very little counsel with a terrific bass voice arises, fully inflated, in the back settlements of the fog, and says, "Will your lordship allow me?
Below, where the fight was beginning, there was still thick fog; on the higher ground it was clearing, but nothing could be seen of what was going on in front.
Looky here, didn't de line pull loose en de raf' go a-hummin' down de river, en leave you en de canoe behine in de fog?"
"We were some distance off, and this fog may have deadened them."
He held them silent with ghastly stories of the "Yo-hoes" on Monomoy Beach, that mock and terrify lonely clam-diggers; of sand-walkers and dune-haunters who were never properly buried; of hidden treasure on Fire Island guarded by the spirits of Kidd's men; of ships that sailed in the fog straight over Truro township; of that harbour in Maine where no one but a stranger will lie at anchor twice in a certain place because of a dead crew who row alongside at midnight with the anchor in the bow of their old-fashioned boat, whistling - not calling, but whistling - for the soul of the man who broke their rest.
Breast, throat, face, were wet; the clothing was saturated; drops of water, condensed from the fog, studded the hair and mustache.
Could see nothing in fog. Rushed on deck, and ran against mate.
We were terrified into this by being suddenly confronted with a vast body which showed itself vaguely for an instant and in the next instant was smothered in the fog again.
But the fog did not lift, and at eleven the sun had not yet shown itself.
Experience has since taught me that these great beasts are as terror-stricken by this phenomenon as a landsman by a fog at sea, and that no sooner does a fog envelop them than they make the best of their way to lower levels and a clear atmosphere.
Just about the same time, the sun had gone down behind the Spy-glass, and as the fog was collecting rapidly, it began to grow dark in earnest.
At length did cross an Albatross: Thorough the fog it came; As if it had been a Christian soul, We hailed it in God's name.