fog

(redirected from fogger)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

able to fog a mirror

Alive, perhaps barely. (If one holds up a mirror to one's nose or mouth, the breath will cause fog to appear.) I spent the whole day moving furniture, so I'm barely able to fog a mirror now. He'll date any woman who's able to fog a mirror.
See also: able, fog, mirror, to

fog in

1. To cover someone or something with fog. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fog" and "in." As we climbed higher in elevation, the trees were increasingly fogged in.
2. To be forced to stay in a particular place because the outside environment is too foggy. We'll have to fly out tomorrow because today's flight is fogged in.
See also: fog

fog over

To become obscured by fog. My glasses fogged over while I was in the shower—I can't see a thing!
See also: fog, over

fog up

1. To become covered in a layer of fog. My glasses fogged up as soon as I stepped out of the ice rink into the August humidity.
2. To cause something to become covered in a layer of fog. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fog" and "up." I breathed on the mirror to fog it up.
3. To become emotional and nearly cry over something. Yes, I fogged up during the graduation ceremony—"Pomp and Circumstance" gets me every time.
See also: fog, up

in a fog

Not fully aware or alert; having one's attention clouded with something. I always feel like I'm in a fog when I take that medication. It's like it's hard for me to think.
See also: fog
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

able to fog a mirror

Fig. Inf. alive, even if just barely. (Usually jocular. Alludes to the use of a small mirror placed under the nose to tell if a person is breathing or not. (Able to can be replaced with can.) Look, I don't need an athlete to do this job! Anybody able to fog a mirror will do fine!
See also: able, fog, mirror, to

fog over

[for something made of glass] to become covered over with water vapor. The windshield fogged over because I forgot to turn on the defroster. The mirror fogged over, and I couldn't see to shave.
See also: fog, over

fog something up

to make something made of glass become covered with a film of water vapor. The moisture fogged the windshield up, and we had to stop to clean it off. The moisture fogged up the glass.
See also: fog, up

fog up

[for something made of glass] to become partially or completely obscured by a film of water vapor. The glass fogged up, and we couldn't see out.
See also: fog, up

in a fog

 and in a haze
Fig. dazed; not paying attention to what is going on around one; not alert. Jane always seems to be in a fog. When I get up, I'm in a fog for an hour. After surgery, I was in a haze until the anesthetic wore off.
See also: fog
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in a fog

Also, in a haze. Preoccupied, not paying attention; also, at a loss, confused. For example, After the accident he went about in a fog, even though he had not been injured, or Millie always seems to be in a haze; she never knows what's going on. These expressions allude to fog or haze obscuring one's view; the fog usage dates from about 1600, haze from about 1800.
See also: fog
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in a fog

in a state of perplexity; unable to think clearly or understand something.
See also: fog
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in a ˈfog

(informal) uncertain and confused: Thank you for your explanation, but I’m afraid I’m still in a fog over what happened.
See also: fog
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

fog in

v.
1. To surround something with fog: The descending mists fogged in the little village. The storm clouds fogged us in on the mountaintop. Because the airport was fogged in, all of the flights were canceled.
2. To cause something to be unable to move safely due to fog. Used chiefly in the passive: The airplane was fogged in and could not land.
See also: fog

fog up

v.
1. To become covered with condensation: The bathroom mirror fogged up after I took a shower.
2. To cause something to become covered with condensation: The steam from the kettle fogged up the kitchen windows. Don't breathe on the lens—you'll fog it up.
3. To become teary-eyed out of a strong sense of emotion: I fogged up when my parents' photo was unveiled.
See also: fog, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Total release foggers (TRFs) (also known as "bug bombs") are pesticide products often used indoors to kill insects.
None of the foggers were effective at killing the bed bugs found out in the wild, and the relatively weaker lab-raised population could escape death simply by hiding under a thin piece of cloth, she (http://entsoc.org/PDF/2012/JONES-BedBugs.pdf) reported in the Journal of Economic Entomology on June 3.
The scientists showed that the fogger could successfully apply two whitefly-killing sprays in a mix with water that reached and coated the lower leaf surface.
Manufactured for about a decade, from the late 1950s to the late 1960s, Blitz Fogger products were offered as an aftermarket attachment for garden tractors and push mowers.
Fogger said that the first step to protect against the negative impacts of stress is to exercise.
Summary: Hyderabad (Telangana) [India], Feb 28 (ANI): A Hyderabad based Nehru Zoological Park has installed sprinklers, foggers and coolers to ensure that the animals are comfortable even as the mercury rises.
Offerings include oxygen tanks and concentrators, liquid oxygen containers, foggers, and equipment for the treatment of sleep apnea, such as Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machines.
Third, adult populations may be reduced by pesticides in aerosol foggers or in sprays applied to vegetation in an infested area.
From shampoos and dips to foggers and collars, conventional flea controls caution consumers to use gloves, and keep product away from skin and mucous membranes.
Pesticide foggers used for treating an entire room usually carry labels instructing occupants to vacate the premises for 1 to 3 hours.
He informed that the department managed spray pumps, Thermal Foggers, Cold Foggers, Delta Mathin, Tami Foss Liquid and other chemicals.
New research now strengthens that association and ties it most closely to sprays and foggers used to treat homes for fleas and ticks.