fly the nest

fly the nest

To move out of one's parents' house for the first time. I'm so nervous to fly the nest and start college this fall because I've never lived on my own before. I can't believe my little girl is getting ready to fly the nest. I'm so proud and so sad all at once!
See also: fly, nest

fly the nest

or

leave the nest

When children fly the nest or leave the nest, they leave their parents' home to live on their own. When their children had flown the nest, he and his wife moved to a cottage in Dorset. One day the children are going to leave the nest and have their own lives. Compare with fly the coop.
See also: fly, nest

fly the nest

(of a young person) leave their parent's home to set up home elsewhere. informal
The image here is of a young bird's departure from its nest on becoming able to fly. Compare with empty nester (at empty).
See also: fly, nest

ˌfly the ˈnest


1 (of a young bird) become able to fly and leave its nest
2 (informal) (of somebody’s child) leave home and live somewhere else: Their children have all flown the nest now.
See also: fly, nest
References in periodicals archive ?
One bird centre is using a live camera feed to give bird lovers a fascinating insight into the siblings as they grow up in readiness to fly the nest at the end of the month.
Centre manager Graeme Innes: "It was a long road for Rebel and our team but we finally got his issues under control and he was ready to fly the nest."
SEEING 14 of his prized assets fly the nest for international duty was the last thing Jose Mourinho wanted to see as his side returned to winning ways against Burnley.
And the colt justified the support, beating Fly The Nest by a length and threequarters in good style.
ONE chick has fledged, it's time to test, himself out there, to fly the nest. With wide young eyes, and wings unfurled, it's time to greet this brave new world.
I must admit I find it all rather bewildering considering very few students ever pay back the loan and the debt, although forbidding is not debt at all, it is not on your credit rating, no bailiff will come calling, and many will fly the nest and emigrate abroad so I do not really see why politicians try to hoodwink the students with false promises, Mickey Mouse contracts and dodgy sums.
A survey of 500 young adults who still live in the home they grew up in found one in 12 (8%) do not ever expect to fly the nest.
Parents expect to have an extra PS257 to spend each month once their children finally fly the nest, a new survey has revealed.
I used to wear mini skirts, But now wear thermal vests, My children are all growing up, And soon will fly the nest, So, I sing along to the old songs, And memories fill my mind, Of people and places long ago, Oh so many happy times, A life well lived and very loved, I know that I've been blessed, I treasure all my photographs, Those family times were the best, I wouldn't swap with anyone, My life, so far, has been ace, And I don't care about those lines, That now live on my face.
HOME bird Gorm is so used to being waited on he's reluctant to fly the nest.
The survey also found that one in 10 young people feared they could be in their late 40s or early 50s before they are able to fly the nest.
1 year ago TONY Mowbray was looking for a slice of the transfer fee as pounds 2.5m defender David Wheater prepared to fly the nest. The Boro boss needed to bring in a replacement as quickly as possible as Wheater contemplated his projected move to Premier League Bolton Wanderers.
17 New homes Sisters Emma and Nikki Grant are so close they decided to fly the nest and buy flats at the same time.
YoU CoUldN't MAKe it UP A FED-UP Italian couple have sought legal help to finally force their 41-yearold son to fly the nest. The unnamed Venetian parents say their lad has a job but refuses to leave home and insists his clothes are washed and his meals prepared.
"They were sad to see her fly the nest, but Chloe has been telling all her mates Sam is the one."