fly high


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fly high

1. To be very happy or jubilant. Molly's been flying high ever since she passed her driver's test.
2. To flourish or have much success. Look at all the money we raised—our charity has really been flying high.
See also: fly, high

flying high

1. In a successful or important position; doing very well. The country was flying high for several years, but the recession brought everything crashing back down to the ground. The company is once again flying high following the massive success of their latest product.
2. In a state of euphoric happiness, excitement, or enthusiasm. Everyone in town was flying high after the team won the championship. After all the stress and worry, I was flying high when I found out that my application had been successful.
See also: flying, high

flying high

 
1. Fig. very successful in one's ambitions; in an important or powerful position. (Often with the implication that this is not the usual situation or will change.) The government is flying high just now, but wait until the budget is announced. He's flying high these days, but he comes from a very poor family.
2. Fig. in a state of euphoria. (From good news, success, or drugs.) Wow! Todd is really flying high. Did he discover a gold mine? Sally is flying high. What's she on?
See also: flying, high

fly high

Be elated, as in They were flying high after the birth of their first baby. This expression alludes to a high pitch of feeling. [Mid-1600s]
See also: fly, high

fly high

be very successful; prosper.
The noun high-flyer (or high-flier ) meaning ‘a successful and ambitious person’ developed from this phrase in the mid 17th century.
See also: fly, high

fly ˈhigh

be successful: The business is flying high at the moment, making large profits and attracting a lot of investors. ▶ ˌhigh-ˈflyer (also ˌhigh-ˈflier) noun: academic high-flyers
See also: fly, high

fly high

To be elated: They were flying high after their first child was born.
See also: fly, high
References in periodicals archive ?
The documentary initially pivots around two major fights--two important chances for Thulasi to break free of her lowly status in Chennai and 'fly high'.
With Texas Fly High, eight students, their team supervisor and a mentor also make the one-and-a-half hour flight with approximately 30 zero-gravity intervals of 25 seconds each.
I'm Boogie boarding on the ocean, Watching the birds fly high. The boats are in the distance While surfers glide right by.
Women fly, too, in the new post-feminist ads for athletic shoes and exercise equipment, and in the writings of the new rightwing "feminist" organizations like No Left Turn and Independent Women's Forum, which preach that gender equity has been achieved and all that's left to do is just to "Go For It," "Knock Yourself Out," "Fly High."
My grandfather gave me a great look of disgust and spoke the truth that was obvious to him: "That commie didn't fly high enough."
Mammy and son together again - fly high angels, look over your family."
Summary: Jammu (Jammu and Kashmir) [India], July 29 (ANI): Minister of State in Prime Minister's Office (PMO) Jitendra Singh on Saturday criticized Jammu and Kashmir Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti's remark on the Indian flag calling it ridiculous and categorically stated that the flag will fly high in the Valley as much as it does in any other state.
PASSENGERS on Britain's largest and newest superliner Ventura will be able to fly high above sea level at Cirque Ventura - the first circus school at sea.
ARTISTIC youngsters were aiming to fly high at Rugby Library when they joined in with a kite-making workshop.
Jones and Susan Kuklin, is spare, simple, and direct: "When I am dancing, I can fly high and soar through the air..." Kuklin's photographs of Jones illustrate the text with fine insight and powerful images.
That's critical because heavy line weighs down a kite, making it impossible to fly high. And height is critical.