flutter

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a flutter in the dovecote

A stir or mild disturbance among a certain organization or group of people, especially one that is typically quiet, reserved, or conservative in nature. Likened to domestic pigeons fluttering their wings in response to an agitation (a dovecote being a structure built to house and raise them). The unexpected entrance of an exuberant young woman caused a bit of a flutter in the dovecote at the old Men's Only club.
See also: dovecote, flutter

flutter the dovecote

To cause a stir or mild disturbance among a certain organization or group of people, especially one that is typically quiet, reserved, or conservative in nature. Likened to domestic pigeons fluttering their wings in response to an agitation (a dovecote being a structure built to house and raise them). The exuberant young woman fluttered the dovecote of the old Men's Only club by bursting in unannounced.
See also: dovecote, flutter

in a flutter

In a nervous, confused, or agitated state. We were all in a flutter waiting to meet the President at our school rally. The economy is still in a flutter after news that the country's largest corporation has filed for bankruptcy.
See also: flutter

flutter about

 and flutter around 
1. Lit. to fly about with quick, flapping motions of the wings. The moths fluttered about aimlessly. A few birds fluttered around.
2. Fig. [for someone] to move about quickly and busily. Aunt Margaret fluttered about, picking up after everyone. Stop fluttering around and sit down!
See also: flutter

flutter about something

 and flutter around something 
1. Lit. to fly around something or some place. The moths were fluttering about the lightbulb. The butterflies fluttered around the bright flowers.
2. Fig. to keep moving busily within a particular place. The maid fluttered about the house, dusting and arranging. She fluttered around the house from room to room.
See also: flutter

flutter down

[for flying or falling things] to flap or float downward. The butterflies fluttered down onto the flowers. The leaves fluttered down from the trees when the breeze blew.
See also: down, flutter

flutter over someone or something

to fly or flap above someone or something. (Also said of a person being fussy about someone or something.) The little moths fluttered over us while we were in the garden. The birds flutter over the fountain, eager for a bath.
See also: flutter, over

in a dither

confused; nervous; bothered. Mary is sort of in a dither lately. Don't get yourself in a dither.
See also: dither

in a dither

Also, all of a dither; in a flutter or tizzy . In a state of tremulous agitation, as in Planning the wedding put her in a dither, or He tried to pull himself together, but he was all of a dither, or She showed up in such a flutter that our meeting was useless. The noun dither dates from the early 1800s and goes back to the Middle English verb didderen, "to tremble"; in a flutter dates from the mid-1700s; in a tizzy dates from about 1930 and is of uncertain origin.
See also: dither

flutter the dovecotes

alarm, startle, or upset a sedate or conventionally minded community.
This expression may come from Shakespeare's Coriolanus: ‘like an eagle in a dove-cote, I Fluttered your Volscians in Corioli’. Compare with put the cat among the pigeons (at cat).
1992 Daily Telegraph It is however the arrival of Michael Heseltine at the DTI that will flutter the dovecotes most of all.
See also: dovecote, flutter

flutter your eyelashes

open and close your eyes rapidly in a coyly flirtatiousmanner.
See also: eyelash, flutter

in a dither

mod. confused; undecided. Don’t get yourself in a dither.
See also: dither
References in periodicals archive ?
Those who attended solo but made their own news included Lucy Liu, who who wore a nude tulle gown with a tiny bit of green beading over strategic places, and Calista Flockhart, who looked her best ever in a fluttery red gown that should win the approval of fashion police on the skinny-girl beat.
that will comfort her and smell the dark, fluttery grass under her arms.
The person suffers arrhythmia, a fluttery heartbeat that pumps insufficient blood to the brain, and faints.
Reed will also show an eyelash pillow featuring rows of fringed cotton for a soft, fluttery look.
The wind is fond of playing, It likes all fluttery things, In spring it chases seed fluff, And puffs at robin's wings.
Created specifically for preschoolers and their families, this release both invites children to play along with the Teletubbies and their furry, feathered and fluttery friends and teaches valuable lessons that parents will appreciate.
FLUTTERY GETS YOU EVERYWHERE Flirting is always done with the eyes so flutter those lashes and let your lids do the talking.
Romanian dancer Alina Cojocaru danced the dual roles of Odette and Odile and caught well the two different characters, one all fluttery and fragile, the other athletic and flirtatious (the terrifying 32 fouettes executed with apparent ease).
It's been banished in favour of fluttery semi-permanent lash extensions that I wake up with every morning from Boudoir Lashes.
Thus the reason I never go to sleep with a little flittery, fluttery moth in the room.
A fluttery tunic looks utterly romantic with red stirrup leggings and lace-up booties.
For fluttery eyelashes, Birmingham beauty Cat Deeley relies on SUQQU Mascara Base, pounds 22 (Selfridges).
The song unfolds as an offbeat love story in which a fluttery, fiery Stump (through Wentz's words) describes himself as being "half doomed" and the object of his affection as being "semi sweet" (Ashlee Simpson, perhaps).