flutter

(redirected from flutters)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

a flutter in the dovecote

A stir or mild disturbance among a certain organization or group of people, especially one that is typically quiet, reserved, or conservative in nature. Likened to domestic pigeons fluttering their wings in response to an agitation (a dovecote being a structure built to house and raise them). The unexpected entrance of an exuberant young woman caused a bit of a flutter in the dovecote at the old Men's Only club.
See also: dovecote, flutter

all in a flutter

In a nervous, confused, or agitated state. We were all in a flutter waiting to meet the president at our school rally. The interviewer kept asking these really vague, convoluted questions and got me all in a flutter.
See also: all, flutter

all of a flutter

In a nervous, confused, or agitated state. We were all of a flutter waiting to meet the president at our school rally. The interviewer kept asking these really vague, convoluted questions and got me all of a flutter.
See also: all, flutter, of

flutter (one's) eyelashes

To flirt with or feign romantic interest in someone. (Literally fluttering one's eyelashes is an exaggerated way of doing so.) Usually but not exclusively refers to women. She kept fluttering her eyelashes at me each time I talked to her, so I'm thinking of asking her out on a date. I like to flutter my eyelashes at bartenders to see if I can get a drink or two for free.
See also: eyelash, flutter

flutter about

1. Literally, to fly around some thing or place in a quick, deft manner. The kids are outside, trying to catch the lightning bugs that are fluttering about.
2. By extension, to move quickly around some place or area. I think Anita is fluttering about the office, straightening up. Good luck finding her.
See also: flutter

flutter around (something)

1. Literally, to fly around some thing or place in a quick, deft manner. The kids are outside, trying to catch the lightning bugs that are fluttering around.
2. By extension, to move quickly around some place or area. I think Anita is fluttering around the office, straightening things up. Good luck finding her.
See also: around, flutter

flutter down

To fall or move slowly or gently downward through the air. The papers slipped out of my hand and fluttered down to the ground.
See also: down, flutter

flutter over (someone or something)

To move through the air above someone or something. A butterfly fluttered over us and then landed in the plants.
See also: flutter, over

flutter the dovecote

To cause a stir or mild disturbance among a certain organization or group of people, especially one that is typically quiet, reserved, or conservative in nature. Likened to domestic pigeons fluttering their wings in response to an agitation (a dovecote being a structure built to house and raise them). The exuberant young woman fluttered the dovecote of the old Men's Only club by bursting in unannounced.
See also: dovecote, flutter

in a dither

In a nervous, confused, or agitated state. We were in a dither waiting to meet the president at our school rally. News that the country's largest corporation has filed for bankruptcy has left the market in a dither. The interviewer kept asking these really vague questions and got me in a dither.
See also: dither

in a flutter

In a nervous, confused, or agitated state. We were all in a flutter waiting to meet the President at our school rally. The economy is still in a flutter after news that the country's largest corporation has filed for bankruptcy. The interviewer kept asking these really vague questions and got me in a flutter.
See also: flutter
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

flutter about

 and flutter around 
1. Lit. to fly about with quick, flapping motions of the wings. The moths fluttered about aimlessly. A few birds fluttered around.
2. Fig. [for someone] to move about quickly and busily. Aunt Margaret fluttered about, picking up after everyone. Stop fluttering around and sit down!
See also: flutter

flutter about something

 and flutter around something 
1. Lit. to fly around something or some place. The moths were fluttering about the lightbulb. The butterflies fluttered around the bright flowers.
2. Fig. to keep moving busily within a particular place. The maid fluttered about the house, dusting and arranging. She fluttered around the house from room to room.
See also: flutter

flutter down

[for flying or falling things] to flap or float downward. The butterflies fluttered down onto the flowers. The leaves fluttered down from the trees when the breeze blew.
See also: down, flutter

flutter over someone or something

to fly or flap above someone or something. (Also said of a person being fussy about someone or something.) The little moths fluttered over us while we were in the garden. The birds flutter over the fountain, eager for a bath.
See also: flutter, over

in a dither

confused; nervous; bothered. Mary is sort of in a dither lately. Don't get yourself in a dither.
See also: dither
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in a dither

Also, all of a dither; in a flutter or tizzy . In a state of tremulous agitation, as in Planning the wedding put her in a dither, or He tried to pull himself together, but he was all of a dither, or She showed up in such a flutter that our meeting was useless. The noun dither dates from the early 1800s and goes back to the Middle English verb didderen, "to tremble"; in a flutter dates from the mid-1700s; in a tizzy dates from about 1930 and is of uncertain origin.
See also: dither
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flutter the dovecotes

alarm, startle, or upset a sedate or conventionally minded community.
This expression may come from Shakespeare's Coriolanus: ‘like an eagle in a dove-cote, I Fluttered your Volscians in Corioli’. Compare with put the cat among the pigeons (at cat).
1992 Daily Telegraph It is however the arrival of Michael Heseltine at the DTI that will flutter the dovecotes most of all.
See also: dovecote, flutter

flutter your eyelashes

open and close your eyes rapidly in a coyly flirtatiousmanner.
See also: eyelash, flutter
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in a dither

mod. confused; undecided. Don’t get yourself in a dither.
See also: dither
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Higgins said: "I'm getting the flutters about joining This Morning.
Atrial flutter is a common complication late after atrial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries.
A-16-year old boy with a history of surgical palliation of d-transposition of the great arteries, a normal systolic ejection fraction, and symptomatic drug refractory atrial flutter was referred for an electrophysiological study and ablation procedure.
She won the cash on the "national" bingo link-up at the Flutters Club, in Rugby Road, Hinckley, over the bank holiday weekend.
Dr Bexton said: "During the procedure, doctors try to electrically burn the tissue which causes the flutters.
RACING fans spent nearly g2million yesterday on festive flutters at a packed Leopardstown.
Ironically, Roses Flutters's stable-companion Nimbus Twothousand, also ridden by Callaghan, was referred to Portman Square after the very next race, the maiden auction.
And in the darkly comic title story, an aging country-club type, his vanity no amulet against time's passage, flutters toward madness like some male Blanche DuBois.
In the conventional view, eddies--perhaps caused by the flagpole--set off the flutters.
You should not panic if you experience a few flutters or your heart races occasionally.
For example, flutters on last night's episode of Eastenders included one from a punter logged on as `westlife01' who offered to lay a pounds 10 bet at odds of 1-2 that Peggy raises pounds 100,000 to buy out Dan on or before May 30.
Pol the parrot is sitting pretty after his flutters on the National Lottery won pounds 480.
"Fluttersuckers," the press release explains, "refers to the characteristics of moths that flutter and ticks that suck." This morsel of information points to the provocative subtexts and symbiotic relationships in images created with impressive sleight of hand.