flutter


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Related to flutter: atrial flutter, flutter device
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a flutter in the dovecote

A stir or mild disturbance among a certain organization or group of people, especially one that is typically quiet, reserved, or conservative in nature. Likened to domestic pigeons fluttering their wings in response to an agitation (a dovecote being a structure built to house and raise them). The unexpected entrance of an exuberant young woman caused a bit of a flutter in the dovecote at the old Men's Only club.
See also: dovecote, flutter

flutter the dovecote

To cause a stir or mild disturbance among a certain organization or group of people, especially one that is typically quiet, reserved, or conservative in nature. Likened to domestic pigeons fluttering their wings in response to an agitation (a dovecote being a structure built to house and raise them). The exuberant young woman fluttered the dovecote of the old Men's Only club by bursting in unannounced.
See also: dovecote, flutter

in a flutter

In a nervous, confused, or agitated state. We were all in a flutter waiting to meet the President at our school rally. The economy is still in a flutter after news that the country's largest corporation has filed for bankruptcy.
See also: flutter

flutter (one's) eyelashes

To flirt with or feign romantic interest in someone. (Literally fluttering one's eyelashes is an exaggerated way of doing so.) Usually but not exclusively refers to women. She kept fluttering her eyelashes at me each time I talked to her, so I'm thinking of asking her out on a date. I like to flutter my eyelashes at bartenders to see if I can get a drink or two for free.
See also: eyelash, flutter

in a dither

In a nervous, confused, or agitated state. We were in a dither waiting to meet the president at our school rally. The economy is still in a dither after news that the country's largest corporation has filed for bankruptcy.
See also: dither

flutter about

1. Literally, to fly around some thing or place in a quick, deft manner. The kids are outside, trying to catch the lightning bugs that are fluttering about.
2. By extension, to move quickly around some place or area. I think Anita is fluttering about the office, straightening up. Good luck finding her.
See also: flutter

flutter down

To fall or move slowly or gently downward through the air. The papers slipped out of my hand and fluttered down to the ground.
See also: down, flutter

flutter over (someone or something)

To move through the air above someone or something. A butterfly fluttered over us and then landed in the plants.
See also: flutter, over

flutter about

 and flutter around 
1. Lit. to fly about with quick, flapping motions of the wings. The moths fluttered about aimlessly. A few birds fluttered around.
2. Fig. [for someone] to move about quickly and busily. Aunt Margaret fluttered about, picking up after everyone. Stop fluttering around and sit down!
See also: flutter

flutter about something

 and flutter around something 
1. Lit. to fly around something or some place. The moths were fluttering about the lightbulb. The butterflies fluttered around the bright flowers.
2. Fig. to keep moving busily within a particular place. The maid fluttered about the house, dusting and arranging. She fluttered around the house from room to room.
See also: flutter

flutter down

[for flying or falling things] to flap or float downward. The butterflies fluttered down onto the flowers. The leaves fluttered down from the trees when the breeze blew.
See also: down, flutter

flutter over someone or something

to fly or flap above someone or something. (Also said of a person being fussy about someone or something.) The little moths fluttered over us while we were in the garden. The birds flutter over the fountain, eager for a bath.
See also: flutter, over

in a dither

confused; nervous; bothered. Mary is sort of in a dither lately. Don't get yourself in a dither.
See also: dither

in a dither

Also, all of a dither; in a flutter or tizzy . In a state of tremulous agitation, as in Planning the wedding put her in a dither, or He tried to pull himself together, but he was all of a dither, or She showed up in such a flutter that our meeting was useless. The noun dither dates from the early 1800s and goes back to the Middle English verb didderen, "to tremble"; in a flutter dates from the mid-1700s; in a tizzy dates from about 1930 and is of uncertain origin.
See also: dither

flutter the dovecotes

alarm, startle, or upset a sedate or conventionally minded community.
This expression may come from Shakespeare's Coriolanus: ‘like an eagle in a dove-cote, I Fluttered your Volscians in Corioli’. Compare with put the cat among the pigeons (at cat).
1992 Daily Telegraph It is however the arrival of Michael Heseltine at the DTI that will flutter the dovecotes most of all.
See also: dovecote, flutter

flutter your eyelashes

open and close your eyes rapidly in a coyly flirtatiousmanner.
See also: eyelash, flutter

in a dither

mod. confused; undecided. Don’t get yourself in a dither.
See also: dither
References in periodicals archive ?
Flutter estimated full-year underlying earnings would drop to between PS420m and PS440m, not including an estimated PS55m loss in its US business.
Flutter said it suffered declines in its high street division
Flutter Entertainment operates as a sports betting and gaming company in the UK, Ireland, Australia, the US and internationally.
A rival exchange called Flutter, founded in 1999 by Josh Hannah and with PS30 million worth of financial backing, had beaten Betfair to the punch.
The Flutter Shutter is still at an early stage, but the "Fairies" hope they can get them fitted to social houses across Liverpool and beyond.
One of the Flutter Shutters, created by the Energy Fairies, installed at one of the Exemplar Homes at Liverpool John Moores University
Prospective randomized comparison of antiarrhythmic therapy versus first-line radiofrequency ablation in patients with atrial flutter. J Am Coll Cardiol.
A public beta has recently been released, and Google is already using Flutter internally for some of its own applications.
Yaman, "Subsonic flutter of cantilever rectangular PC plate structure," International Journal of Aerospace Engineering, vol.
From 2004-2006 to 2013, 71 people were diagnosed with high blood pressure and 44 with a heart flutter.
Furthermore, the phenomenon of "flutter" is dangerous leading to degradation of the structure.
Now that the breeding season is in full swing the fledgling sparrows fearlessly perch on the garden furniture just inches from our patio windows, they flutter off to join their siblings and wait patiently while mum feeds them in turn, all seen just feet from our windows.
Wow and Flutter is Spicers most compelling work to date.
Flutter is a potentially damaging dynamic aeroelastic phenomenon where aerodynamic forces with the natural modes of vibration cause a periodic motion of a structure going unstable.
Previous researches have mainly optimized aircraft structures from the perspectives of both static and dynamic constraints such as stress, displacement, modal frequency, and flutter constraints; see, for example, the previous publications by Sikes et al.