flush

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busted flush

1. Literally, a hand in poker consisting of four cards of the same suit and one that is different, i.e., one card short of a flush. I thought I'd finally win the hand, but when I drew the ace of spades, I was left with a busted flush.
2. A person, organization, or thing that at one time held great potential or influence but that ultimately ended up a failure. Jack left secondary school with great grades and a bright future, but he became addicted to drugs and turned out a busted flush. The company promised big returns to investors but turned out to be a busted flush.
See also: busted, flush

be in the first flush of (something)

To be in the beginning or early stages of something. Of course they're happy now—they're still in the first flush of marriage!
See also: first, flush, of

the first flush of (something)

The beginning or early stages of something. Of course they're happy now—they're still in the first flush of marriage!
See also: first, flush, of

flush out

1. To use liquids to expel something from something else. A noun or pronoun can be used between "flush" and "out." If you get debris in your eyes, be sure to flush them out with water immediately.
2. To force someone or something out of hiding. A noun or pronoun can be used between "flush" and "out." That loud crash flushed out a stray cat from under our porch. Police have the suspect surrounded and are hoping to flush him out with tear gas.
See also: flush, out

in the first flush of (something)

In the earliest of beginning stages, especially when energy, effort, or enthusiasm are at their peak. Of course they're happy now—they're still in the first flush of marriage! Let's see how they're doing ten years down the line. The novel consists of parallel storylines: one follows the protagonist in the first flush of adulthood, while the other examines how his views have changed after a lifetime of experience and hardship.
See also: first, flush, of

flush someone or something out of some place

 and flush someone or something out
to cause someone or something to leave a hiding place. (Originally from hunting.) The police flushed the gunman out from his hiding place. They flushed out the crooks.
See also: flush, of, out, place

flush something away

to wash something unwanted away. Flush all this mess away! Fred flushed away all the leaves on the sidewalk.
See also: away, flush

flush something out

to clean something out with a flow of liquid. Flush the fuel line out to clean it. Please flush out the fuel line and clean it.
See also: flush, out

flush with something

 
1. Lit. even with something; sharing a surface with something. The edge of the sink is flush with the counter. The wood flooring is flush with the carpet so people won't trip.
2. Fig. [of a face] red with anger, embarrassment, rage, etc. He faced the woman he had dreamed about all his life. His face flushed with recognition and his heart pounded. Ellen's face flushed with embarrassment.
See also: flush

in the flush of

Also, in the first or full flush of . During a sudden rush of a strong positive feeling regarding something, as in In the first flush of victory he decided to take all his friends to dinner. This expression employs flush in the sense of "a bout of emotion or passion." [c. 1600]
See also: flush, of

a busted flush

someone or something that has not fulfilled expectations; a failure. US informal
In the game of poker, a busted flush is a sequence of cards of one suit that you fail to complete.
See also: busted, flush

in the first flush

in a state of freshness and vigour.
The exact origins of flush as a noun are unknown; early senses share the idea of a sudden rush or abundance of something (e.g. water, growth of grass, or emotion).
1997 Tom Petsinis The French Mathematician A month ago, in the first flush of enthusiasm…I tackled the classic problem of trisecting an angle using only a compass and straightedge.
See also: first, flush

(in) the first flush of ˈyouth, enˈthusiasm, etc.

when somebody is young or something is new: By then, he was no longer in the first flush of youth.In the first flush of enthusiasm, we were able to get everyone interested in helping.
See also: first, flush, of

flush out

v.
1. To empty or clean something by a flow of water or liquid: After coming in contact with the caustic substance, she flushed out her eye, which was red and puffy. The school nurse flushed the child's eyes out after he got fingerpaint in them.
2. To cause something to leave or be removed from something with a flow of water or liquid: She ran to the sink to flush out the dirt from her cut. My tears flushed the sand out of my eye.
3. To frighten someone or something from a concealed place: The golden retriever jumped into the reeds and flushed out the ducks. The passing car flushed the birds out of the thicket.
4. To drive or force someone into the open: The sniper is hiding in one of the buildings to the south and won't be easy to flush out. The army pledged to flush all insurgents out of the village.
See also: flush, out

flush

mod. wealthy; with plenty of money. Today I am flush. By tomorrow, I’ll be broke.

flushed down the tubes

Defeated. A 1950s college expression drawn from waste removal. After an exam that was more difficult than anticipated, a student might groan, “Man, did I get flushed down the tubes!”
See also: down, flush, tube
References in periodicals archive ?
We benchmarked the Mercedes S-Class and Lexus LS430 for gaps, fit, and flushness despite the fact that these are much more expensive cars," says Zellner.
Perceptron also produces systems that can be used to automatically measure paint appearance (checking for such things as orange peel and the amount of gloss), a system known as AutoSpect, and to measure gaps and flushness of closure panels including hoods, doors, and lift gates, a system known as AutoFit.
Then someone pulls out a feeler gauge and measures the gaps and flushness.
General Motors uses these sensors to manage the gap and flushness between the mounting brackets and glass in automotive sunroofs to reduce noise, and improve aerodynamics for fuel economy.