flown


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Related to flown: past participle

fly beneath (the/someone's) radar

To go without being noticed, detected, or addressed. A: "Have you heard this band's latest album?" B: "I didn't even know it was out, it must have flown beneath my radar." Every year, the government promises to do something about the homelessness problem, yet every year it seems to fly beneath the radar.
See also: beneath, fly, radar

fly under (the/someone's) radar

To go without being noticed, detected, or addressed. A: "Have you heard this band's latest album?" B: "I didn't even know it was out, it must have flown under my radar." Every year, the government promises to do something about the homelessness problem, yet every year it seems to fly under the radar again.
See also: fly, radar

fly a kite

1. To suggest something in order to gauge interest in it or others' perception of it. When everyone objected to my idea, I reassured them that I was just flying a kite and had not made any sort of decision on the matter.
2. To ponder a potential reason or explanation for something. Oh, you're just flying a kite—you don't really know why Emily didn't come to the party.
See also: fly, kite

fly the flag

To stand up for, support, or defend someone or something. A number of people from the actor's hometown are coming to New York to fly the flag at his debut performance on Broadway. My country is often a target for insults or gibes abroad, so whenever I go traveling I make a point of flying the flag for it.
See also: flag, fly

the bird has flown

Someone or something has left, fled, escaped, etc.; someone or something is no longer here. I'm afraid you're not going to find him here. The bird has flown.
See also: bird, flown

fly across (something)

To traverse a place or area by plane. I live in California, but the rest of my family is in New York, so I've flown across the country many times.
See also: across, fly

fly apart

To break into pieces violently; to shatter. There are bits of wood everywhere because that rickety old chair flew apart the minute I put that heavy box on it.
See also: apart, fly

fly around

To move through the air around someone or something (who may or may not be mentioned specifically after "around"). Ugh, there are so many mosquitos flying around tonight! Why are so many gnats flying around us all of a sudden?
See also: around, fly

fly away

To leave some place or area by flying. Look, the birds are flying away for the winter.
See also: away, fly

fly from (someone or something) to (some place)

To flee to some specific thing or place while evading someone or something. Only one of the burglars was caught—the rest must have flown from the police to a secret hiding place.
See also: fly

fly into the face of danger

To do something risky, unsafe, or unwise. Of course Steve went bungee-jumping—that guy loves to fly into the face of danger. You need to make good decisions when driving, OK? No flying into the face of danger.
See also: danger, face, fly, of

fly kites

To write a check that exceeds the amount currently in its bank account and then depositing the check at a second bank, so that one can use funds from the second bank—at least until one gets caught. A: "Is it true that Drew got busted for writing bad checks?" B: "Oh yeah, he was flying kites all over town."
See also: fly, kite

fly light

To skip or miss a meal. I'll just have some tea—I'm flying light today.
See also: fly, light

fly out of (some place)

1. To convey or move someone or something from one place to another. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "fly" and "out." They're flying his artwork out of Paris for this big exhibit in New York.
2. To travel from a particular city or airport, as of an airline. But I don't think that airline flies out of Dulles, so we'll have to pick another one.
3. To depart from some place or thing hastily. We flew out of the restaurant at the sound of the fire alarm.
See also: fly, of, out

fly up to (some place)

To travel by plane to a location that is further north or at a higher elevation. I live in Florida now, but I still regularly fly up to Boston to see my family.
See also: fly, up

fly apart

to break apart, throwing pieces around. Don't run the engine too fast or it will fly apart! Mary's bicycle wheel flew apart during the race.
See also: apart, fly

fly around

to soar or float aloft randomly. There were insects flying around everywhere. Planes flew around all day and all night, making it hard to sleep.
See also: around, fly

fly around someone or something

to soar or float in the air near someone or something. We saw seven helicopters flying around the stadium. A bunch of mosquitoes flew around me.
See also: around, fly

fly away

to take flight and depart. The owl hooted one last hoot and flew away. All the birds flew away when the cat came around.
See also: away, fly

fly into the face of danger

Fig. to take great risks; to threaten or challenge danger, as if danger were a person. (This may refer to flying, as in an airplane, but not necessarily.) John plans to go bungee jumping this weekend. He really likes flying into the face of danger. Willard was not exactly the type to fly into the face of danger, but tonight was an exception, and he ordered extra-hot enchiladas.
See also: danger, face, fly, of

bird has flown, the

The individual sought has gone away, as in Jean hoped to meet her editor at long last, but when she arrived the bird had flown. This idiom has been used for an escaped prisoner, and more generally, as in 1655 by William Gurnall ( The Christian in Complete Armour): "Man ... knows not his time ... he comes when the bird is flown." [Mid-1600s]
See also: bird

the bird has flown

If you say the bird has flown, you mean that the person you are looking for has escaped or disappeared. He'd been told to follow the woman to work and wait till she came out again. Instead he'd wandered off, come back at her normal leaving time and found the bird had flown.
See also: bird, flown

fly the flag

COMMON
1. If you fly the flag for your country or a group to which you belong, you represent it or do something to support it. I would love to fly the flag for Britain and win the Eurovision Song Contest. Note: Verbs such as carry, show or wave are sometimes used instead of fly. The Kuwaiti team said they were only in Peking to show the flag. He believed in the sacred power of great music: he felt that he was carrying the flag of high culture.
2. If you fly the flag for something, you support it and praise it. Wragg was left to fly the flag for state education. Note: Verbs such as carry, show or wave are sometimes used instead of fly. I think it's important that we wave the flag for the arts.
See also: flag, fly

the bird has flown

the person you are looking for has escaped or gone away.
See also: bird, flown

fly the flag

1 (of a ship) be registered to a particular country and sail under its flag. 2 represent or demonstrate support for your country, political party, or organization, especially when you are abroad.
In sense 2, the forms show the flag , carry the flag , and wave the flag are also found.
2 1996 Hello! She flew the flag for British tennis in the Eighties.
See also: flag, fly

fly a kite

try something out to test opinion. informal
A historical sense of this phrase was ‘raise money by an accommodation bill’, meaning to raise money on credit, and this sense of testing public opinion of your creditworthiness gave rise to the current figurative sense. The US phrase go fly a kite! means ‘go away!’.
See also: fly, kite

the bird has ˈflown

the person who was being chased or looked for has escaped or gone away: The police raided the house at dawn, but the bird had flown.
See also: bird, flown

fly a ˈkite

(British English, informal) release a bit of information, etc. in order to test public reaction to something that you plan to do at a later date: Let’s fly a kite. Tell the papers that the government is thinking of raising the school leaving age to 18, and we’ll see what the reaction is.
A kite is a kind of toy that you fly in the air at the end of one or more long strings. It will tell you which way the wind is blowing.
See also: fly, kite

fly kites

tv. to distribute or pass bad checks. (see also kite.) Marty was picked up for flying kites in three different cities.
See also: fly, kite

fly light

in. to skip a meal or eating. Nothing for me, thanks. I’m flying light today.
See also: fly, light