flow

(redirected from flowing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

get (one's) juices flowing

To become inspired to greater creativity, productivity, or energy, or to cause such a feeling in someone. I've been having trouble getting this essay started—I just need to get my juices flowing. I find that a good run first thing in the morning always gets my juices flowing for the day ahead. We've been sitting here for an hour with nothing written, so let's play a few word games to get our juices flowing.
See also: flow, get, juice

go against the flow

To do, think, and/or believe things that are different or contrary to those of the majority of people. All these kids think they are going against the flow, but they're really all dressed the same!
See also: flow

be in full flow

To be happening at a fast pace. If you're not coming home for Christmas, you need to tell mom because her planning is already in full flow.
See also: flow, full

a cash flow problem

A lack of money, typically due to spending more money than is being earned. After years of unaddressed cash flow problems, the company went bankrupt. I'm having a bit of a cash flow problem right now, so can I pay you back next week?
See also: cash, flow, problem

ebb and flow

1. verb To consistently increase and decrease. I wouldn't worry too much about losing money this quarter because we'll earn it back later in the year. That's just how business ebbs and flows.
2. noun A period of consistent increase and decrease. I wouldn't worry too much because we always lose money this quarter and then earn it back later in the year. It's just the natural ebb and flow of business.
See also: and, ebb, flow

stem the tide

To stop something from continuing or worsening. Once the people turn on you, you'll have a hard time stemming the tide of rebellion.
See also: stem, tide

go with the flow

To follow along with an event as it proceeds, without trying to assert control over it. We always do things your way—can't you just go with the flow for once?
See also: flow

cash flow problem

a lack of hard currency. My real estate business has a temporary cash flow problem. Due to his cash flow problem, he was unable to pay his employees that month.
See also: cash, flow, problem

ebb and flow

to decrease and then increase, as with tides; a decrease followed by an increase, as with tides. The fortunes of the major political parties tend to ebb and flow over time. The ebb and flow of democracy through history is a fascinating subject.
See also: and, ebb, flow

flow across something

to stream or glide across something. A mass of cold air flowed across the city and froze us all. The floodwaters flowed across the fields and ruined the spring planting.
See also: across, flow

flow along

to move along evenly, as a liquid flows. At the base of the dam, the river began to flow along at a slower pace. The project flowed along quite nicely.
See also: flow

flow away

to course or move away. The floodwaters flowed away as fast as they had come. All the spilled water flowed away.
See also: away, flow

flow from something

to run out from something. The blood flowed from the wound on his hand and stained his shirt. The oil flowed from the cracked engine and made a mess on the floor.
See also: flow

flow (from something) (to something)

to course from one thing to another. This water flows all the way from Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico. Rain flows to the river from this very drain.

flow in(to) something

to course into something; to pour into something. The words flowed into my head, and I felt like I could write again. The water flowed in when I opened the door on the flood.
See also: flow

flow out

 (of something)
1. Lit. to course out of something. The apple juice flowed out of the press as we turned the crank. It stopped flowing out when we had crushed the apples totally.
2. Fig. [for people] to issue forth from something. The people flowed out of the stadium exits. At the end of the game, the people flowed out in a steady stream.
See also: flow, out

flow over someone or something

 
1. Lit. [for a liquid or something that flows] to move over someone or something. The water flowed over the land, covering everything. She slipped and fell into the icy creek and the water flowed over her, freezing her almost to death.
2. Fig. [for some kind of feeling] to envelop someone. A sense of peace flowed over her. Patriotic feelings flowed over the crowd as they listened to the national anthem.
See also: flow, over

flow with something

to have some liquid coursing on the surface or within someone or something. The sewers were flowing with the floodwaters. Her veins must flow with ice water. She is so cold.
See also: flow

go with the flow

 and go with it
Inf. to cope with adversity; to accept one's lot. No, just relax and go with the flow. Go with it. Don't fight it.
See also: flow

ebb and flow

A decline and increase, constant fluctuations. For example, He was fascinated by the ebb and flow of the Church's influence over the centuries. This expression alludes to the inward and outward movement of ocean tides. [Late 1500s]
See also: and, ebb, flow

go with the flow

Also, go with the tide. Move along with the prevailing forces, accept the prevailing trend, as in Rather than striking out in new directions, I tend to go with the flow, or Pat isn't particularly original; she just goes with the tide. The flow in the first and more colloquial term, which dates from the late 1900s, alludes to the ebb and flow of tides and probably gained currency because of its appealing rhyme.
See also: flow

stem the tide

Stop the course of a trend or tendency, as in It is not easy to stem the tide of public opinion. This idiom uses stem in the sense of "stop" or "restrain." [Mid-1800s]
See also: stem, tide

ebb and flow

COMMON The ebb and flow of something is the way that it continuously changes, especially in its amount or level. The advantage to the employer is flexibility to cope with the commercial ebb and flow. The vineyards are tucked into small clearings formed by the natural ebb and flow of the hills and the trees. Note: Ebb and flow is also used as a verb meaning to change continuously, especially in amount or level. During those thirty years the fortunes of the British film industry ebbed and flowed. Note: This expression comes from the idea of the tide ebbing and flowing (= going in and out).
See also: and, ebb, flow

go with the flow

COMMON If you go with the flow, you let things happen to you or do what other people want, rather than trying to control what happens yourself. This year I'm going to leave my troubles and tension in the departure lounge and go with the flow. Sometimes you just have to go with the flow of creativity.
See also: flow

in full flow

BRITISH or

in full flood

COMMON
1. If an activity, or the person who is performing the activity, is in full flow or in full flood, the activity has started and is being done with a lot of energy and enthusiasm. When she's in full flow, she often works right through the night. To hear the drum and bass of the Barrett brothers in full flow is a real treat for long-time fans. A campaign of public accusation is now in full flood. Note: You can also say that someone or something is in full spate. With family life in full spate, there were nevertheless some times of quiet domesticity.
2. If someone is in full flow or in full flood, they are talking quickly and for a long time. A male voice was in full flow in the lounge. Vicki was in full flood on the subject of her last boyfriend, a fellow lawyer she'd met at a charity ball.
See also: flow, full

stem the tide

or

stem the flow

COMMON If you stem the tide or stem the flow of something bad which is happening to a large degree, you start to control and stop it. The authorities seem powerless to stem the rising tide of violence. The cut in interest rates has done nothing to stem the flow of job losses.
See also: stem, tide

ebb and flow

a recurrent or rhythmical pattern of coming and going or decline and regrowth.
This expression makes reference to the regular movement of the tides, where ebb means move away from the land and flow move back towards it.
See also: and, ebb, flow

go with the flow

be relaxed; accept a situation. informal
The image here is of going with the current of a stream rather than trying to swim against it.
1997 J-17 Go with the flow today. You can't change the way things are going to pan out, so just let it all happen.
See also: flow

in full flow

1 talking fluently and easily and showing no sign of stopping. 2 performing vigorously and enthusiastically.
See also: flow, full

the ˌebb and ˈflow (of somebody/something)

the repeated, often regular, movement from one state to another; the repeated change in level, numbers or amount: the ebb and flow of money/seasonsShe sat quietly, enjoying the ebb and flow of conversation.
This expression refers to the movement of the sea away from and towards the land.
See also: and, ebb, flow

go with the ˈflow

(informal) be relaxed and not worry about what you should do: He’s very stubborn so there’s really no point in trying to change his mind. It’s best to just go with the flow.• ebb → the ebb and flow (of somebody/something)
See also: flow

ˌstem the ˈtide (of something)

stop the large increase of something bad: The police are unable to stem the rising tide of crime.
See also: stem, tide

flow from

v.
To originate in and develop from something; stem from: The second paragraph does not flow from the first in logical sequence. Many interesting discussions flowed from our initial conversation.
See also: flow

cash flow

n. cash; ready money. When I get a little cash flow at the end of the week, I’ll treat you to a hamburger.
See also: cash, flow

flow

in. to menstruate. She’s flowing and could go swimming.

go with the flow

and go with it
in. to cope with adversity; to accept one’s lot. No, just relax and go with the flow.
See also: flow
References in periodicals archive ?
Several terms are commonly used to describe the relative amounts of liquid and gas in a flowing stream.
The key to accurately measuring wet gas flow is to understand how a metering system reacts to liquids flowing with the gas stream.
However, air flowing in the core easily exhausts through the large number of vents, and the core pressure remains near atmospheric.
The finishing operations differ from traditional EPDM in that it does not result in solid baled products, but lends itself to the production of free flowing, pelletized products.
They found that propagating patterns form in flowing sand consisting of rough, faceted grains but not in sand consisting of smooth, rounded grains of the same size.
A core from the upper reservoir section was taken and analyzed, confirming an excellent reservoir section highly capable of flowing gas.
In a typical eight-cavity, H-pattern mold, the flow will split again, with most of the high-shear, hotter, low-viscosity material flowing to one cavity on each tertiary runner section, which therefore fills first.
Leakage flow is directed across a heated element so that some of the heat is transferred to the flowing gas.
This is the fourth of five targeted cash flowing acquisitions which are designed to maximize shareholder value.
But when a molten plastic flowing through the mold contacts a relatively cold wall, it freezes instantly into a virtually amorphous or noncrystalline outer layer with almost no shrinkage occurring.
patents 6,242,209 and 6,280,967 for methods relating to the application of compounds to a flowing cell suspension and measuring of the real-time responses of individual cells flowing through a detector.
A net 42' of upper Cotton Valley sand was stimulated (Hydro-fractured) on July 16 and flow back operations initiated on July 18 on a 5/64" choke at an initial flowing tubing pressure of 3200 psi.
The Skagit itself, supplemented by reservoir water from PSE and Seattle City Light, is flowing at only about half its normal level.
NetScout Systems' Application Flow Management architecture connects the network to the business by offering solutions that manage both the network infrastructure and the applications flowing across it that support the business.
This suggests that a continued weakening in the REIT market is being masked in part by the continuing stream of new money flowing into dedicated REIT stock management accounts.