flop

(redirected from flopper)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

flip-flop

1. To completely change one's opinion or stance. Primarily heard in US. The voters were tired of hearing the candidate flip-flop and felt they could not trust him to stick with one position. I used to hold a staunch view about the case, but then I flip-flopped after hearing the other side's testimony.
2. noun A complete change in opinion or stance. There have been several flip-flops among the candidates during the campaign, with some changing their stance more than once!
3. noun A thong sandal. Often used in the plural to refer to the pair. Don't forget your flip-flops when we go to the beach, or you'll have to walk on the hot sand barefoot!

cow chip

slang A piece of cow feces. Watch out for cow chips when walking through that field.
See also: chip, cow

do an about-face

To suddenly and completely turn or change one's direction. This phrase can describe one's physical movement or a change in concept. She did an about-face and walked back up the steps once she saw that the subway wasn't running. Based on the reactions we got from test audiences, we need to do an about-face with the movie's plot.

flop account

An Instagram account intended to facilitate discussion of a particular topic or range of topics (such as fandom, politics, or social issues), typically exclusively by teens, who often administer such accounts collaboratively. The term derives from the common practice of posting "flops," things presented for ridicule or criticism. More and more teens are turning to flop accounts to debate sensitive issues.
See also: account, flop

cow flop

Cow feces. Watch out for cow flops when you're out by the barn.
See also: cow, flop

flop around

To flail or otherwise move around awkwardly. He must be having a nightmare, judging by how he's flopping around in his bed. The fish flopped around on dry land.
See also: around, flop

flop as (something)

To fail in a particular role or pursuit. You have an angelic voice, so there's no way you'll flop as a singer! I flopped as a manager because I just couldn't seem to motivate my team.
See also: flop

flop down

1. To fling or plop oneself down onto some surface or thing. I knocked a few pillows onto the floor when I flopped down on the couch. As soon as Paulina flopped down onto the bed with a big sigh, I knew that her date must not have gone well.
2. To plop something down onto some surface or thing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "flop" and "down." Once I realized she was angry with me, I flopped her Valentine's present down and left.
See also: down, flop

flop down on(to) (something)

1. To fling or plop oneself down onto some surface or thing. I knocked a few pillows onto the floor when I flopped down on the couch. As soon as Paulina flopped down onto the bed with a big sigh, I knew that her date must not have gone well.
2. To plop something down onto some surface or thing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "flop" and "down." Once I realized she was angry with me, I flopped her Valentine's present down on the table and left.
See also: down, flop

flop into (something)

To fling or plop oneself down into something. I knocked a few pillows onto the floor when I flopped into the armchair.
See also: flop

flop over

To turn someone or something over roughly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "flop" and "over." As soon as the lifeguard flopped the boy over, he started coughing up water. Hey, don't just flop that over—it's breakable!
See also: flop, over

flophouse

slang An inexpensive, shabby place of lodging. Ew, we can't stay in a flophouse like that, no matter how cheap it is. It's probably infested with bedbugs!

cow chip

 and cow pie; cow patty; cow flop
Inf. a piece of cow manure. The pioneers didn't have much wood, so they burned dried cow chips. How did that big ol' cow pie get in the middle of my flower bed? Tom slipped on a cow patty.
See also: chip, cow

flop around

[for something] to turn around awkwardly; [for a fish out of water] to squirm and flap. The hose flopped around, throwing water first this way and then that, knocking down plants as it flopped. A number of fish flopped around in the bottom of the boat.
See also: around, flop

flop as something

to be a failure in a particular aspect of something in one's life or career. He flopped as an actor. I don't want to flop as a public speaker.
See also: flop

flop down

to sit down heavily or awkwardly. Be graceful. Don't just flop down! When I reached the chair, all I could do was flop down.
See also: down, flop

flop into something

[for someone] to fall or drop into something, such as bed, a chair, a bathtub, etc. Maggie flopped into the chair and slipped off her shoes. Tom flopped into bed and fell fast asleep.
See also: flop

flop someone or something over

to turn someone or something over, awkwardly or carelessly. They flopped the unconscious man over, searching for his identification. They flopped over the injured man.
See also: flop, over

flop something down on(to) something

 and flop something down
to drop or slap something down on something. She flopped the liver down on the cutting board. She flopped down the raw meat.
See also: down, flop, on

do an about-face

Also, do a flip-flop or one-eighty . Reverse one's opinion or course of action. For example, The board did an about-face on acquiring more land, or We expected Dad to do a flip-flop concerning our vacation plans, or They had relied on Jim to vote for Harry, but he did a one-eighty and cast his vote for the incumbent . The first term, alluding to the army command to turn around, dates from the first half of the 1900s, and the variants from the second half of the 1900s (the last refers to a 180-degree change of direction).

cow flop

and cow plop
n. a mass of cow dung. Mrs. Wilson is out in the pasture gathering cow flops for her garden. When walking out on the range land, we try to avoid “cow plops,” as the wranglers call them.
See also: cow, flop

flip-flop

1. n. a reversal. The president denied making a flip-flop. He said he simply forgot his earlier position.
2. n. the return trip of a long journey. (see also flip side.) Didn’t we chat on the flip-flop last week?
3. in. to change direction or intensity. Jed flip-flopped twice in the evening, leaving us where we started.
4. in. to waver in one’s decisions. Well, you just flip-flop all you want. I know what I want.

flop

1. n. a failure. The play was a flop. The entire audience left during the second act.
2. n. a place to sleep for the night; a bed in a flophouse. The old man was looking for a flop for the night.

flophouse

n. a very cheap hotel offering only rows of beds. This place is a flophouse! I won’t stay here for a moment.
References in periodicals archive ?
This forward-traveling, backwards-flipping water entry separates the belly floppers from the Louganises and is best performed in front of girls with outie bellybuttons wearing tube tops, smoking cigarettes with Cheeto-stained fingers.
Briny Baird and Bo Van Pelt are two men that spring to mind as examples of perennial final-round floppers on the US Tour but, despite securing three victories in Europe, Tim Clark is fast proving himself the worst finisher of them all in America.
The early twentieth century "tin floppers" inspected sheets of tin by hand, flipping them to look for defects.
One commercial emphasizes the Beautyrest 2000's ability to prevent a person's sleep from being interrupted by "floppers," or mates that toss and turn.
One woman proclaims, "I've got nothing against floppers; I mean, I'm married to one."
Pinching keeps these normally 4-foot floppers compact
Huxen, operates as Floppers Foods selling ready-to-eat seafood products and is based in Daphne, Alabama.
Prominent among floppers is Chicago-based developer Robert Falor, who lost control of the Royal Palm, Breakwater and Edison hotels in South Beach after failing to transform them to condo-hotels.
In 1973, Kenneth Lundmark proved Fosbury's intuition correct with a University of Oregon master's thesis on "a comparative mechanical analysis of the Fosbury flop and straddle styles of high jumping." Using stop-action photography, Lundmark demonstrated how accomplished floppers can pass over a high bar with their body's center of gravity never ascending as high as the bar itself.
TRUTHS Asters must be the world champion floppers, in horticultural terms what the Fosbury Flop is to athletics, a jump in which the athlete flings himself parallel to the ground in a bid to clear the high jump bar.
MIAMI - David Stern is determined to stop the floppers, even if it takes until the next morning.
But Cosmopolitan has named Celine Dion and Gwen Stefani, lead singer with group No Doubt, as "chart- floppers" along with former EastEnder Martine.
"Players don't like to be known as floppers. Have you seen the floppy-eared rabbit?