flood

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be in floods (of tears)

To be crying often or excessively. Ever since her father died, Beth has been in floods of tears.
See also: flood

be in full flood

1. Literally, to be overflowing, as of a river or similar body of water. Thanks to all the rain we've had this spring, the river is in full flood.
2. To be well underway and continuing at a fast pace. If you're not coming home for Christmas, you need to tell Mom because her planning is already in full flood. After a slow start, the convention is now in full flood.
See also: flood, full

flood (someone or something) with (something)

1. Literally, to shower or deluge someone or something with water. High tide flooded the sand with water.
2. By extension, to overwhelm someone with something. The familiar smells of my mother's cooking flooded me with memories of my childhood.
See also: flood

flood in(to something)

1. Of a liquid, to move quickly into something. I turned on the tap at full-blast, and water flooded into the bathtub.
2. By extension, to move quickly into some place or thing in large numbers. As soon as the bell rang, kids began flooding into the building.
See also: flood

flood out

1. Of a gas or liquid, to move out (of something) very quickly and in great quantities. I pulled out the stopper in the drain, causing water to flood out. All the warm air in the car flooded out through the open window.
2. Of people, to move out (of some place or thing) very quickly and in large numbers. As soon as the dismissal bell rang, kids began flooding out into the schoolyard. Employees flooded out of the building at the sound of the fire alarm.
3. To cause someone or something to leave or flee some place or thing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "flood" and "out." We must not have picked a great place to set up our tent, because the high tide flooded us out. The dam burst, flooding out several thousand people from their homes.
See also: flood, out

flood out of (something)

1. Of a gas or liquid, to move out of something very quickly and in great quantities. I pulled out the stopper, causing water to flood out of the bathtub. All the warm air in the car flooded out through the open window.
2. Of people, to move quickly out of some place or thing in large numbers. As soon as the dismissal bell rang, kids began flooding out of the school building.
3. To cause someone or something to leave or flee some thing or place due to rising water levels. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "flood" and "out." We must not have picked a great place on the beach to camp, because high tide flooded us out of our tent. I suspect that the rains have flooded many animals out of their burrows.
See also: flood, of, out

flood the market

To become available in large numbers, often for low prices. Don't get one of those cheap phones that seem to be flooding the market these days.
See also: flood, market

flood the zone

1. In sports, to apply a large amount of pressure to a particular area of play. Their left safety is shaky, so let's try flooding the zone with the tight end and both wide receivers on the next play. We know she's going to flood the zone with high fastballs, so lay off 'em.
2. To put forth or provide a large quantity of something. We need to flood the zone as best we can to get this story heard. That means I want everyone posting about it on social media, blogging about it, anything to get it out into the public consciousness. His opponent flooded the zone with ads that proved devastating to his chances of reelection.
See also: flood, zone

in full flood

1. Happening or being undertaken at a fast pace or with a lot of vigor and enthusiasm. Primarily heard in UK. If you're not coming home for Christmas, you need to tell Mom because her planning is already in full flood. Campaigns for both sides are now in full flood ahead of the May election.
2. Engaging in or characteristic of a manner of speaking that is fluent, quick, and/or lengthy. Primarily heard in UK. After a couple of drinks during dinner, my uncle was in full flood about his position on immigration.
See also: flood, full

in full flow

1. Happening or being undertaken at a fast pace or with a lot of vigor and enthusiasm. Primarily heard in UK. If you're not coming home for Christmas, you need to tell Mom because her planning is already in full flow. Campaigns for both sides are now in full flow ahead of the May election.
2. Engaging in or characteristic of a manner of speaking that is fluent, quick, and/or lengthy. Primarily heard in UK. After a couple of drinks during dinner, my uncle was in full flow about his position on immigration.
See also: flow, full
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

flood in

 (to something)
1. Lit. [for a fluid] to flow quickly into something in great volume. The water flooded in and soaked the carpets.
2. Fig. [for large amounts or numbers or people or things] to pour or rush into something. The people flooded into the hall. We opened the door, and the dogs and cats flooded in.
See also: flood

flood out

 (of something)
1. Lit. [for water or something that flows] to rush out of something. The water flooded out of the break in the dam.
2. Fig. [for people] to rush out of something or some place. The people flooded out of the theater, totally disgusted with the performance.
See also: flood, out

flood someone or something out of something

 and flood someone or something out
[for too much water] to force someone or something to leave something or some place. The high waters flooded them out of their home. The high waters flooded out a lot of people.
See also: flood, of, out

flood someone or something with something

to cover or inundate someone or something with something. We flooded them with praise and carried them on our shoulders. The rains flooded the fields with standing water.
See also: flood
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in full flow

BRITISH or

in full flood

COMMON
1. If an activity, or the person who is performing the activity, is in full flow or in full flood, the activity has started and is being done with a lot of energy and enthusiasm. When she's in full flow, she often works right through the night. To hear the drum and bass of the Barrett brothers in full flow is a real treat for long-time fans. A campaign of public accusation is now in full flood. Note: You can also say that someone or something is in full spate. With family life in full spate, there were nevertheless some times of quiet domesticity.
2. If someone is in full flow or in full flood, they are talking quickly and for a long time. A male voice was in full flow in the lounge. Vicki was in full flood on the subject of her last boyfriend, a fellow lawyer she'd met at a charity ball.
See also: flow, full
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

be in full flood

1 (of a river) be swollen and overflowing its banks. 2 have gained momentum; be at the height of activity.
2 1991 Journal of Theological Studies There is too much detail for comfort…which is somewhat confusing when exposition is in full flood.
See also: flood, full

in full flow

1 talking fluently and easily and showing no sign of stopping. 2 performing vigorously and enthusiastically.
See also: flow, full
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌflood the ˈmarket

offer for sale large quantities of a product, often at a low price: Importers flooded the market with cheap toys just before Christmas.
See also: flood, market

be in ˈfloods (of ˈtears)

(informal) be crying a lot: She was in floods of tears after a row with her family.
See also: flood
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

flood out

v.
To force something out or away from some place due to a current or influx of water: The torrential rains flooded out most of the coastal residents. High tides regularly flood the smaller animals and insects out of spaces between the rocks. We were flooded out by the broken water line.
See also: flood, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Major flooding causes extensive inundation of structures and roads and it frequently requires evacuation in the low-lying areas," the National Weather Service said.
The representative of National Emerncy Management Agency (NEMA), Aikpokpo Ebahi while speaking stated that the agency appreciates the efforts of IUFMP, adding that since its inception, Oyo state has not experienced any major flooding.
"I want to help other areas set up new groups and community plans in response to flooding, as well as supporting existing groups.
<BRelief is at hand for owners of Northumberland homes at risk of flooding
He explained that by examining the rate at which lichen grows on boulders disturbed by floods, the date of the floods can be determined and he has found severe flooding going back hundreds of years.
Mr Hargreaves added: "Warkworth's new flood defences, which have been designed to fit in with the character of the town, are an excellent example of where we have used local funding and expertise to the reduce the risk of flooding."
The report from the Environment Agency says Cardiff has not had a significant flooding event for several years and the last flood of note that caused property damage and disruption was in 2009.
Hursh also reminded Texans that flooding can occur even when the home or business is not in the flood zone.
"Working together as a group is vital during flooding to help ensure a fast response, and having an emergency plan in place can prevent stress later on, protect properties and ultimately help save lives.
The first detailed account of Missouri River flooding occurred in 1881 when an ice jam break flooded northeastern Nebraska.
Payouts to customers whose homes or businesses have been hit by flooding have totalled pounds 4.5bn since 2000 - a 200% increase on the pounds 1.5bn paid out during the previous decade in real terms, according to the Association of British Insurers (ABI).
Flooding may take place when volume of water within a body of water such as a river or lake overflows or breaks levees and as a result, some of the water escapes its usual boundaries.
Villagers and organisations from Alcester, where around 160 properties were affected by the summer flooding, have been working with partner agencies to ensure their area will be protected should the situation arise again.
Summary: A sixth of all homes in England are at risk of flooding, the Environment Agency has warned.
And with approximately 185,000 commercial properties at risk from flooding in the UK, Landmark Information Group has launched a comprehensive, conveyancing-ready flood report that identifies potential flood risk to a specific commercial property.