flood


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

be in floods (of tears)

To be crying often or excessively. Ever since her father died, Beth has been in floods of tears.
See also: flood

be in full flood

1. Literally, to be overflowing, as of a river or similar body of water. Thanks to all the rain we've had this spring, the river is in full flood.
2. To be well underway and continuing at a fast pace. If you're not coming home for Christmas, you need to tell mom because her planning is already in full flood. After a slow start, the convention is now in full flood.
See also: flood, full

flood the market

To become available in large numbers, often for low prices. Don't get one of those cheap phones that seem to be flooding the market these days.
See also: flood, market

in full flood

1. Happening or being undertaken at a fast pace or with a lot of vigor and enthusiasm. Primarily heard in UK. If you're not coming home for Christmas, you need to tell mom because her planning is already in full flood. Campaigns for both sides are now in full flood ahead of the May election.
2. Of speech, fluently, quickly, and at great length. Primarily heard in UK. After a couple of drinks during dinner, my uncle was in full flood about his position on immigration.
See also: flood, full

in full flow

1. Happening or being undertaken at a fast pace or with a lot of vigor and enthusiasm. Primarily heard in UK. If you're not coming home for Christmas, you need to tell mom because her planning is already in full flow. Campaigns for both sides are now in full flow ahead of the May election.
2. Of speech, fluently, quickly, and at great length. Primarily heard in UK. After a couple of drinks during dinner, my uncle was in full flow about his position on immigration.
See also: flow, full

flood in

 (to something)
1. Lit. [for a fluid] to flow quickly into something in great volume. The water flooded in and soaked the carpets.
2. Fig. [for large amounts or numbers or people or things] to pour or rush into something. The people flooded into the hall. We opened the door, and the dogs and cats flooded in.
See also: flood

flood out

 (of something)
1. Lit. [for water or something that flows] to rush out of something. The water flooded out of the break in the dam.
2. Fig. [for people] to rush out of something or some place. The people flooded out of the theater, totally disgusted with the performance.
See also: flood, out

flood someone or something out of something

 and flood someone or something out
[for too much water] to force someone or something to leave something or some place. The high waters flooded them out of their home. The high waters flooded out a lot of people.
See also: flood, of, out

flood someone or something with something

to cover or inundate someone or something with something. We flooded them with praise and carried them on our shoulders. The rains flooded the fields with standing water.
See also: flood

in full flow

BRITISH or

in full flood

COMMON
1. If an activity, or the person who is performing the activity, is in full flow or in full flood, the activity has started and is being done with a lot of energy and enthusiasm. When she's in full flow, she often works right through the night. To hear the drum and bass of the Barrett brothers in full flow is a real treat for long-time fans. A campaign of public accusation is now in full flood. Note: You can also say that someone or something is in full spate. With family life in full spate, there were nevertheless some times of quiet domesticity.
2. If someone is in full flow or in full flood, they are talking quickly and for a long time. A male voice was in full flow in the lounge. Vicki was in full flood on the subject of her last boyfriend, a fellow lawyer she'd met at a charity ball.
See also: flow, full

be in full flood

1 (of a river) be swollen and overflowing its banks. 2 have gained momentum; be at the height of activity.
2 1991 Journal of Theological Studies There is too much detail for comfort…which is somewhat confusing when exposition is in full flood.
See also: flood, full

in full flow

1 talking fluently and easily and showing no sign of stopping. 2 performing vigorously and enthusiastically.
See also: flow, full

ˌflood the ˈmarket

offer for sale large quantities of a product, often at a low price: Importers flooded the market with cheap toys just before Christmas.
See also: flood, market

be in ˈfloods (of ˈtears)

(informal) be crying a lot: She was in floods of tears after a row with her family.
See also: flood

flood out

v.
To force something out or away from some place due to a current or influx of water: The torrential rains flooded out most of the coastal residents. High tides regularly flood the smaller animals and insects out of spaces between the rocks. We were flooded out by the broken water line.
See also: flood, out
References in periodicals archive ?
A third of properties at risk are still not registered to receive flood warnings, as residents have not signed up to the EAs free flood warning service.
Sarah is working on behalf of the Environment Agency and the Durham & Darlington Civil Contingencies Unit (CCU) to increase flood resilience in areas at risk of flooding.
He said that full coordination among the departments should be ensured for fulfilling responsibilities during rescue operation in case of heavy flood in rivers Jhelum and Chenab.
Families still buy policies in the usual way and deal directly with their own insurers, but if a claim is approved it's Flood Re who will pay out.
Representatives from the state, county, FEMA and their mapping partners will use interactive flood hazard maps to answer property owners' flood risk and insurance questions and explain the preliminary flood hazard maps.
The Flood Free Homes campaign, which is supported by Friends of the Earth, the National Flood Forum, the Know Your Flood Risk campaign and the Property Care Association's Flood Protection Group, aims to raise the issues of long-term flood defence investment and land and water management.
There are listed volunteer flood wardens and local councillors who can take resident observations into the local flood forum; in the case of Kinmel Bay this is the Morfa Rhuddlan West Flood Group Partnership.
org/flooding - advises property owners to undertake a more accurate assessment of the flood risk to their property.
Overall, it is estimated that the total value of assets under flood risk is more than pounds 200bn.
Heather Shepherd, from the National Flood Forum, said: "Flood Plan UK enables both community-led groups and those that manage flood risk to improve communication and be better prepared to withstand the devastating effects of a flood.
To some insurance adjusters, if you describe a building as being flooded, that means the building has to have flood insurance under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) in order to be covered.
The EU member states will from now on be obliged to identify the river basins and coastal zones in their territory exposed to flooding and to draw up flood risk maps for the zones concerned.
Launching a national flood awareness campaign today, Barbara Young, EA chief executive, said: "We all have locks on our doors and many of us install alarms to protect our home and possessions against burglary.
CDS Business Mapping LLC, a provider of online property risk mapping, has announced the addition of a new flood elevation report to its RiskMeter Online service.