flood


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be in floods (of tears)

To be crying often or excessively. Ever since her father died, Beth has been in floods of tears.
See also: flood

be in full flood

1. Literally, to be overflowing, as of a river or similar body of water. Thanks to all the rain we've had this spring, the river is in full flood.
2. To be well underway and continuing at a fast pace. If you're not coming home for Christmas, you need to tell Mom because her planning is already in full flood. After a slow start, the convention is now in full flood.
See also: flood, full

flood the market

To become available in large numbers, often for low prices. Don't get one of those cheap phones that seem to be flooding the market these days.
See also: flood, market

in full flood

1. Happening or being undertaken at a fast pace or with a lot of vigor and enthusiasm. Primarily heard in UK. If you're not coming home for Christmas, you need to tell Mom because her planning is already in full flood. Campaigns for both sides are now in full flood ahead of the May election.
2. Engaging in or characteristic of a manner of speaking that is fluent, quick, and/or lengthy. Primarily heard in UK. After a couple of drinks during dinner, my uncle was in full flood about his position on immigration.
See also: flood, full

in full flow

1. Happening or being undertaken at a fast pace or with a lot of vigor and enthusiasm. Primarily heard in UK. If you're not coming home for Christmas, you need to tell Mom because her planning is already in full flow. Campaigns for both sides are now in full flow ahead of the May election.
2. Engaging in or characteristic of a manner of speaking that is fluent, quick, and/or lengthy. Primarily heard in UK. After a couple of drinks during dinner, my uncle was in full flow about his position on immigration.
See also: flow, full

flood out

1. To move very quickly out of some place or thing. Despite the connotation of the word "flood," this usage is not limited to water. When our washer broke, water flooded out of the laundry room. Employees flooded out of the building at the sound of the fire alarm.
2. To cause someone or something to move from a place or thing due to a deluge of water. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "flood" and "out." The water main break flooded out all of the residents on that block.
See also: flood, out

flood in(to) (something)

1. Of a liquid, to move quickly into something. I turned on the tap at full-blast, and water flooded into the bathtub.
2. By extension, to move quickly into some place or thing in large numbers. As soon as the bell rang, kids began flooding into the school building.
See also: flood

flood out of (something)

1. Of a liquid, to move quickly out of something. I pulled out the stopper, causing water to flood out of the bathtub.
2. To move quickly out of some place or thing in large numbers. As soon as the dismissal bell rang, kids began flooding out of the school building.
3. To cause someone or something to leave or flee some thing or place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "flood" and "out." High tide flooded us out of our tent. I suspect that the rains have flooded many animals out of their burrows.
See also: flood, of, out

flood (someone or something) with (something)

1. Literally, to shower or deluge someone or something with water. High tide flooded the sand with water.
2. By extension, to overwhelm someone with something. The familiar smells of my mother's cooking flooded me with memories of my childhood.
See also: flood

flood in

 (to something)
1. Lit. [for a fluid] to flow quickly into something in great volume. The water flooded in and soaked the carpets.
2. Fig. [for large amounts or numbers or people or things] to pour or rush into something. The people flooded into the hall. We opened the door, and the dogs and cats flooded in.
See also: flood

flood out

 (of something)
1. Lit. [for water or something that flows] to rush out of something. The water flooded out of the break in the dam.
2. Fig. [for people] to rush out of something or some place. The people flooded out of the theater, totally disgusted with the performance.
See also: flood, out

flood someone or something out of something

 and flood someone or something out
[for too much water] to force someone or something to leave something or some place. The high waters flooded them out of their home. The high waters flooded out a lot of people.
See also: flood, of, out

flood someone or something with something

to cover or inundate someone or something with something. We flooded them with praise and carried them on our shoulders. The rains flooded the fields with standing water.
See also: flood

in full flow

BRITISH or

in full flood

COMMON
1. If an activity, or the person who is performing the activity, is in full flow or in full flood, the activity has started and is being done with a lot of energy and enthusiasm. When she's in full flow, she often works right through the night. To hear the drum and bass of the Barrett brothers in full flow is a real treat for long-time fans. A campaign of public accusation is now in full flood. Note: You can also say that someone or something is in full spate. With family life in full spate, there were nevertheless some times of quiet domesticity.
2. If someone is in full flow or in full flood, they are talking quickly and for a long time. A male voice was in full flow in the lounge. Vicki was in full flood on the subject of her last boyfriend, a fellow lawyer she'd met at a charity ball.
See also: flow, full

be in full flood

1 (of a river) be swollen and overflowing its banks. 2 have gained momentum; be at the height of activity.
2 1991 Journal of Theological Studies There is too much detail for comfort…which is somewhat confusing when exposition is in full flood.
See also: flood, full

in full flow

1 talking fluently and easily and showing no sign of stopping. 2 performing vigorously and enthusiastically.
See also: flow, full

ˌflood the ˈmarket

offer for sale large quantities of a product, often at a low price: Importers flooded the market with cheap toys just before Christmas.
See also: flood, market

be in ˈfloods (of ˈtears)

(informal) be crying a lot: She was in floods of tears after a row with her family.
See also: flood

flood out

v.
To force something out or away from some place due to a current or influx of water: The torrential rains flooded out most of the coastal residents. High tides regularly flood the smaller animals and insects out of spaces between the rocks. We were flooded out by the broken water line.
See also: flood, out
References in periodicals archive ?
This was apprised by Director General Punjab Emergency Service Dr Rizwan Naseer in a meeting held at Rescue Headquarters here on Tuesday during review meeting of Flood Rescue Operations.
Homeowners who receive federal flood disaster assistance must acquire and maintain flood insurance for their building.
Millennials - those born between 1981 and 1996- are nearly three times more likely to have purchased flood insurance than their older Baby Boomer counterparts born between 1944 and 1964, according to a national survey from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC).
Overall, less than half of Americans who agree that having flood insurance is important have purchased flood insurance, according to a national survey from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC).
She also said that the flooding could possibly be worse than the devastating floods of 1993 and 2011.
Home piers or columns can lift the lowest floor of a home above flood level.
One of such is a conference aimed at beaming the searchlight on the flood menace, talk of preventive measures, preparation and mitigation techniques and reasons why every individual should play a role to complement government's efforts and respect policies on flood mitigation to stakeholders from flood prone communities.
Due to heavy floods, the Canals Department has established flood watching camps at Nala-i-Ouj and Nala-i-Dek.
In the report, Flood Re, Our Vision: Preparing for a future of affordable flood insurance, the reinsurer also argued for the need to accept that a small number of residential risk will never be seen as affordable.
Ramlee after a flash flood in George Town July 30, 2018.
Research shows that people aged 18 to 34 years old are least likely to perceive flood risk in their area, know how to protect their homes or where to get information from.
They will help businesses and residents to understand their risk of flooding and ensuring those in floodrisk areas are signed up to receive free flood warnings.
The aim of the present study explored an assessment of flood rehabilitation strategies in Muzaffargarh district.
FAISALABAD -- Punjab Minister for Zakat & Ushr/Incharge flood fighting arrangements of Faisalabad Division Malik Nadeem Kamran on Saturday directed the concerned departments to re-examine Flood Fighting Plan for removal of its all minor flaws to cope with any emergency like situation due to flood in rivers.
London: Fitch Ratings says in a new report that Flood Re, a joint industry- and government-sponsored scheme to enable flood cover to be affordable for those households at highest risk of flooding, will be effective in making home insurance temporarily affordable for policyholders but will not reduce flood risk in the long term.