flog

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flog the dolphin

vulgar slang Of a man, to masturbate.
See also: flog

flog the log

vulgar slang Of a man, to masturbate.
See also: flog, log

beat a dead horse

To continue to focus on something—especially an issue or topic—that is no longer of any use or relevance. We've all moved on from that problem, so there's no use beating a dead horse.
See also: beat, dead, horse

flog a dead horse

To continue to focus on something—especially an issue or topic—that is no longer of any use or relevance. We've all moved on from that problem, so there's no use flogging a dead horse.
See also: dead, flog, horse

flog (something) to death

To linger over or discuss something so long and to such a tedious and laborious extent that the subject is no longer of any interest or relevance. I think we should move on to another topic before we flog this one to death. The film's rhetorical message has been flogged to death by everyone you talk to.
See also: death, flog

be flogging a dead horse

To be continuing to focus on something, especially an issue or topic, that is no longer of any use or relevance. I don't know why you're flogging a dead horse—the rest of us have moved on from that problem.
See also: dead, flog, horse

flog a dead horse

 and beat a dead horse
Fig. to insist on talking about something that no one is interested in, or that has already been thoroughly discussed. The history teacher lectured us every day about the importance of studying history, until we begged him to stop flogging a dead horse. Jill: I think I'll write the company president another letter asking him to prohibit smoking. Jane: There's no use beating a dead horse, Jill; he's already decided to let people smoke.
See also: dead, flog, horse

flog someone to death

Lit. to beat someone to death with a whip. In the movie, the captain ordered the first mate to flog the sailor to death.
See also: death, flog

flog something to death

Fig. to dwell on something so much that it no longer has any interest. Stop talking about this! You've flogged it to death. Walter almost flogged the whole matter to death before we stopped him.
See also: death, flog

beat a dead horse

Also, flog a dead horse. Try to revive interest in a hopeless issue. For example, Politicians who favor the old single-tax idea are beating a dead horse. From the 1600s on the term dead horse was used figuratively to mean "something of no current value," specifically an advance in pay or other debt that had to be worked ("flogged") off. [Second half of 1800s]
See also: beat, dead, horse

work your guts out

or

flog your guts out

or

slog your guts out

INFORMAL
If you work your guts out, flog your guts out or slog your guts out, you work very hard. These women were amazing. They worked their guts out from 7.30 to 4.30 every day, often all evening and weekend too if they had families. I've been slogging my guts out for months, trying to get this project finished.
See also: gut, out, work

be flogging a dead horse

BRITISH or

be beating a dead horse

AMERICAN
If someone is flogging a dead horse, they are wasting their time trying to achieve something that cannot be done. After putting in all that hard work it feels like we're flogging a dead horse — it's all very discouraging. You're beating a dead horse on this. These guys are defeated.
See also: dead, flog, horse

flog a dead horse

waste energy on a lost cause or unalterable situation.
1971 Cabinet Maker & Retail Furnisher If this is the case, we are flogging a dead horse in still trying to promote the scheme.
See also: dead, flog, horse

ˌflog a dead ˈhorse

(British English, informal) waste your effort by trying to do something that is no longer possible: Pam’s flogging a dead horse trying to organize the theatre trip. It’s quite obvious that nobody’s interested.
If an animal or a person is flogged, it is/they are hit many times with a whip or a stick, usually as a punishment.
See also: dead, flog, horse

ˌflog something to ˈdeath

(British English, informal) talk/write about or deal with a subject so often that there is no longer any interest in it: The word ‘new’ has really been flogged to death in advertisements, and nobody believes it any more.
See also: death, flog, something

flog

(flɑg)
tv. to promote, hype, or support something; to try to sell something aggressively. Fred was flogging this car so hard, I figured he was trying to get rid of it.

dead horse, to beat/flog a

To pursue a futile goal or belabor a point to no end. That this sort of behavior makes no sense was pointed out by the Roman playwright Plautus in 195 b.c. The analogy certainly seems ludicrous; what coachman or driver would actually take a whip to a dead animal? The figurative meaning has been applied for centuries as well; often it is used in politics, concerning an issue that is of little interest to voters. However, some writers, John Ciardi among them, cite a quite different source for the cliché. In the late eighteenth century, British merchant seamen often were paid in advance, at the time they were hired. Many would spend this sum, called a dead horse, before the ship sailed. They then could draw no more pay until they had worked off the amount of the advance, or until “the dead horse was flogged.”
See also: beat, dead, flog
References in periodicals archive ?
"But now something is off-balance, causing a disastrous interaction between flogs and fungus," Lips says.
Golden flogs wave at each other with their front legs.
Generally, the word toad is used to describe stocky flogs that walk rather than hop, live primarily on land, and have dry skin with poison-filled warts.
Originally scientists believed that poison flogs manufactured their own poison.
Like other poisonous creatures, bright colors tell predators to stay away and give the poison flogs an advantage over others frog species.
According to Caldwell, the most poisonous flogs are found in Colombia.
In fact, leopard flogs have become so rare that the U.S.
By the end of the school year, the class had released about 80 flogs into the wild.