flock

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birds of a feather

Similar or like-minded people. A shorthand version of the full proverb "birds of a feather flock together," meaning people who have similar interests, ideas, or characteristics tend to seek out or associate with one another. I knew you and John would get along well. You're birds of a feather, after all.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather flock together

People who have similar interests, ideas, or characteristics tend to seek out or associate with one another. I knew you and John would get along well, seeing as you both enjoy science fiction so much. Birds of a feather flock together.
See also: bird, feather, flock, of, together

flower of the flock

The best person or thing in a group. Your cupcakes are just the flower of the flock—there is no better item at the bake sale. She's the best we've got, the flower of the flock, so you should absolutely put her on this case.
See also: flock, flower, of

flock after (someone or something)

To pursue or follow someone or something in large numbers. A: "Whoa, I almost got mowed down by a ton of teens!" B: "They must have been flocking after the hunky actor that just left the restaurant."
See also: after, flock

flock around (someone or something)

To gather around someone or something in large numbers. A: "Why is there such a big crowd outside?" B: "Oh, people must be flocking around the hunky actor that just left the restaurant."
See also: around, flock

flock in(to) (some place or thing)

To move into some place or thing in large numbers. As soon as the bell rang, kids began flocking into the school building.
See also: flock, place

flock to (someone or something)

To visit or come to someone or something in large numbers. Kids always flock to Aunt Judy—she must have the magic touch. People have been flocking to our restaurant ever since we got that glowing review in the Sunday paper.
See also: flock

flock together

To come together or form a group. Often used of animals. We watched as the geese flocked together overhead.
See also: flock, together

Birds of a feather flock together.

Prov. Similar people tend to associate with each other. I always thought Amy was pretentious, and now she's going out with that snobbish boy, Louis. Birds of a feather flock together. George: Why do you think Donald is dishonest? Ned: All his friends are dishonest. Birds of a feather flock together.
See also: Bird, feather, flock, of, together

flock after someone or something

to follow someone or something in a group. The children flocked after the man playing the flute. Fans flocked after the movie star as he went from his limo into the hotel.
See also: after, flock

flock around someone or something

to crowd around someone or something. All the children will flock around the magician to see how the tricks are performed. The guests flocked around the birthday cake.
See also: around, flock

flock in(to) (some place)

Fig. [for people] to move into some place in crowds. People were flocking into the store where everything was on sale.
See also: flock

flock to someone or something

Fig. [for people] to come to someone or something in great numbers. Many people flocked to the shopping mall for the post holiday discounts. The kids flocked to the movie theater on Saturday afternoon.
See also: flock

flock together

to gather together in great numbers. (*Typically said of birds and sheep.) A large number of blackbirds flocked together, making a lot of noise. Do sheep really flock together in a storm?
See also: flock, together

birds of a feather (flock together)

Individuals of like character, taste, or background (tend to stay together), as in The members of the club had no trouble selecting their yearly outing-they're all birds of a feather . The idea of like seeks like dates from ancient Greek times, and "Birds dwell with their kind" was quoted in the apocryphal book of Ecclesiasticus. The full saying in English, Birds of a feather flock together, was first recorded in 1545.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

If you describe two or more people as birds of a feather, you mean that they are very similar in many ways. Nancy and my mother were birds of a feather. You felt something special between them that left you out. We're birds of a feather, you and me, Mr Plimpton. Note: You can also use the full expression birds of a feather flock together to mean that similar people like to be with each other. Birds of a feather flock together. Basically, people seek out neighbourhoods that are most congenial to them.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

people with similar tastes, interests, etc.
This phrase comes from the proverb birds of a feather flock together , which has been current in this form since the late 16th century. Its origins may ultimately lie in the Apocrypha: ‘the birds will resort unto their like’ (Ecclesiasticus 27:9).
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a ˈfeather (flock toˈgether)

(saying) similar people (spend time together): She spent most of her time abroad with other English speakers, which I suppose is only natural. Birds of a feather flock together, after all.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

and BOF
phr. & comp. abb. people who share an interest or proclivity. Those guys are really birds of a feather. They are always together. We’re BOF and love to hike and enjoy nature.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

Individuals of similar taste, background, or other characteristics in common. The term is a shortening of the proverb, “Birds of a feather flock together,” an observation made more than two thousand years ago by Ben Sira in the apocryphal book of Ecclesiasticus. The sentiment was transferred to human beings and repeated by numerous English writers from Shakespeare’s time on.
See also: bird, feather, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Jeff Steed, Cobb southeast technical manager Jeff Steed said, "This is an incredible accomplishment and some 25 eggs better than the average Cobb500 flock in 2015."
Entrants will be judged on how effectively they manage their flock, taking into account farm type, size and management practices.
Clark said smaller scale flocks sometimes don't use certain common industry standards that prevent the introduction of disease.
Brood flocks have a very tight-knit social grouping.
MILLBURY -- The students and staff of Assumption School were surprised to find a flock of 40 pink flamingos roosting in the school's front yard on Wednesday morning.
The increased number of flocks can change the hunting game entirely.
###Season wise prevalence of viral diseases in layer flocks in District Lahore.
In meat and egg lines of Japanese quail, the hatching traits are important for economical breeding and also for propagation of the flocks.
Zoning, and every other aspect pertaining to backyard flocks, is left to the discretion of city and county regulators.
Later on, the 12.69% incidence of mycoplasmosis was reported in Faisalabad District among the 430 flocks with respiratory problems [7].
In this savanna, bird mixed flocks are common, conspicuous and easily observed, mainly during the prolonged dry season.
He sold for 10,000gn to Jeff and Sue Wilkinson, who will take him to work in their Langlands flock near Richmond, North Yorkshire.
Ouellette and Thornton made this discovery by studying flocks of jackdaws, a gray-headed English cousin of the crow.
Although most outbreaks occurred in commercial flocks (n = 464), outbreaks in "20 backyard flocks also were reported (2).
Seven leader flocks have been recruited for the first year of the project and more flocks will join the project over the next five years, with a target of 35 flocks participating by the end of the project.