flock


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birds of a feather

Similar or like-minded people. A shorthand version of the full proverb "birds of a feather flock together," meaning people who have similar interests, ideas, or characteristics tend to seek out or associate with one another. I knew you and John would get along well. You're birds of a feather, after all.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather flock together

People who have similar interests, ideas, or characteristics tend to seek out or associate with one another. I knew you and John would get along well, seeing as you both enjoy science fiction so much. Birds of a feather flock together.
See also: bird, feather, flock, of, together

flower of the flock

The best person or thing in a group. Your cupcakes are just the flower of the flock—there is no better item at the bake sale. She's the best we've got, the flower of the flock, so you should absolutely put her on this case.
See also: flock, flower, of

flock after (someone or something)

To pursue or follow someone or something in large numbers. A: "Whoa, I almost got mowed down by a ton of teens!" B: "They must have been flocking after the hunky actor that just left the restaurant."
See also: after, flock

flock around (someone or something)

To gather around someone or something in large numbers. A: "Why is there such a big crowd outside?" B: "Oh, people must be flocking around the hunky actor that just left the restaurant."
See also: around, flock

flock in(to) (some place or thing)

To move into some place or thing in large numbers. As soon as the bell rang, kids began flocking into the school building.
See also: flock, place

flock to (someone or something)

To visit or come to someone or something in large numbers. Kids always flock to Aunt Judy—she must have the magic touch. People have been flocking to our restaurant ever since we got that glowing review in the Sunday paper.
See also: flock

flock together

To come together or form a group. Often used of animals. We watched as the geese flocked together overhead.
See also: flock, together

Birds of a feather flock together.

Prov. Similar people tend to associate with each other. I always thought Amy was pretentious, and now she's going out with that snobbish boy, Louis. Birds of a feather flock together. George: Why do you think Donald is dishonest? Ned: All his friends are dishonest. Birds of a feather flock together.
See also: Bird, feather, flock, of, together

flock after someone or something

to follow someone or something in a group. The children flocked after the man playing the flute. Fans flocked after the movie star as he went from his limo into the hotel.
See also: after, flock

flock around someone or something

to crowd around someone or something. All the children will flock around the magician to see how the tricks are performed. The guests flocked around the birthday cake.
See also: around, flock

flock in(to) (some place)

Fig. [for people] to move into some place in crowds. People were flocking into the store where everything was on sale.
See also: flock

flock to someone or something

Fig. [for people] to come to someone or something in great numbers. Many people flocked to the shopping mall for the post holiday discounts. The kids flocked to the movie theater on Saturday afternoon.
See also: flock

flock together

to gather together in great numbers. (*Typically said of birds and sheep.) A large number of blackbirds flocked together, making a lot of noise. Do sheep really flock together in a storm?
See also: flock, together

birds of a feather (flock together)

Individuals of like character, taste, or background (tend to stay together), as in The members of the club had no trouble selecting their yearly outing-they're all birds of a feather . The idea of like seeks like dates from ancient Greek times, and "Birds dwell with their kind" was quoted in the apocryphal book of Ecclesiasticus. The full saying in English, Birds of a feather flock together, was first recorded in 1545.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

If you describe two or more people as birds of a feather, you mean that they are very similar in many ways. Nancy and my mother were birds of a feather. You felt something special between them that left you out. We're birds of a feather, you and me, Mr Plimpton. Note: You can also use the full expression birds of a feather flock together to mean that similar people like to be with each other. Birds of a feather flock together. Basically, people seek out neighbourhoods that are most congenial to them.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

people with similar tastes, interests, etc.
This phrase comes from the proverb birds of a feather flock together , which has been current in this form since the late 16th century. Its origins may ultimately lie in the Apocrypha: ‘the birds will resort unto their like’ (Ecclesiasticus 27:9).
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a ˈfeather (flock toˈgether)

(saying) similar people (spend time together): She spent most of her time abroad with other English speakers, which I suppose is only natural. Birds of a feather flock together, after all.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

and BOF
phr. & comp. abb. people who share an interest or proclivity. Those guys are really birds of a feather. They are always together. We’re BOF and love to hike and enjoy nature.
See also: bird, feather, of

birds of a feather

Individuals of similar taste, background, or other characteristics in common. The term is a shortening of the proverb, “Birds of a feather flock together,” an observation made more than two thousand years ago by Ben Sira in the apocryphal book of Ecclesiasticus. The sentiment was transferred to human beings and repeated by numerous English writers from Shakespeare’s time on.
See also: bird, feather, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Selling for 15,000gns was Alasdair MacLean's Tiree Donegal ET from the West Coast island which sold to the mainland to work in Robert and James Hamilton's Shawtonhill and Mid Shawtonhill flocks near Strathaven as well as Alistair Meikle's Whindyke flock near Jackton, Glasgow.
Ouellette says that scientists and engineers who are planning the future of autonomous vehicles based upon a conventional understanding of group behavior--which posits that the herd, flock, or swarm move as a homogeneous unit--might need to go back to the drawing board.
What if there are several kinds of birds in the flock and the biologists need to know the total numbers of each kind?
Our study targeted backyard flocks that were located within a 1-km radius from HPAI H5N8 outbreaks reported on commercial farms in Gers (n = 169) (Figure).
Reserve male champion was the first prize recorded ram lamb from Elfyn Owen's Cernyw flock, Llanddoged, while the reserve female was another from Phil May, this time a homebred ewe lamb.
Of the 26 owners who were surveyed, 100% of respondents reported regularly consuming eggs from their flock (Table 1), and 54% (n = 14) reported using other products from their chickens such as feathers (for decoration/adornment), feces/litter (for compost), and eggshells (for compost or as a calcium supplement for the flock; Table 1).
Goat flock and farming monitoring was performed in an uncontrolled environment where there were no boundaries and where a wildlife environment was provided.
After moving to Gallowshill Farm at Cambo, Northumberland, Mr Porksen purchased a flock of Texel sheep, which were in the top 1% of rated ewes.
Mean of all the observed values taken after 1st, 7th and 14th brooding day were calculated for both the anti-coagulated and serum blood samples for the two flocks. Standard deviations were also calculated to apply unpaired t test to find out p-value.
(3) Give your flock free access to a dry, secure shelter.
Consider caring for the flock during all four seasons, but especially winter (and summer).
A flock regarded as unable or unworthy of discerning between good and bad fishes despite a lifetime's worth of religious teaching is a telltale sign of a failed messiah or, worse, a false one.
New York, NY, September 17, 2015 --(PR.com)-- Innovative Software Developers Anizak Announces Release Flock, a New York City Subway App That Can be a Life Saver
Charlie Armstrong and shepherd Mark Goldosky, who manage the 1,200 ewe Beulah flock at Fenton and Doddington, have been named the overall winners of Glendale Show's inaugural Flock Competition.