flit

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moonlight flit

A hasty nighttime departure, typically done to avoid paying money that one owes. Primarily heard in UK. I can't afford the rent this month, so we need to make a moonlight flit!
See also: flit, moonlight

do a moonlight flit

To depart hastily at night, typically to avoid paying money that one owes. I can't afford the rent this month, so we need to do a moonlight flit!
See also: flit, moonlight

flit about

To move in a quick, deft manner. The kids are outside, trying to catch the lightning bugs that are flitting about. I think Anita is flitting about the office, straightening up. Good luck finding her.
See also: flit

flit from (something to something)

To move quickly from thing to thing. I'm sorry, I have to go inside—there are just too many bees flitting from plant to plant out here! You wouldn't make so many mistakes if you stopped flitting from job to job and really focused on what you were doing.
See also: flit

flit from (something) to (something)

To move quickly from thing to thing. I'm sorry, I have to go inside—there are just too many bees flitting from plant to plant out here! You wouldn't make so many mistakes if you stopped flitting from job to job and really focused on what you were doing.
See also: flit

flit from person to person

To move quickly from one person to another. That guy's a politician, so he's just spent the whole night flitting from person to person, naturally.
See also: flit, person

flit about

to move about quickly; to dart about. A large number of hummingbirds were flitting about. Butterflies and moths flitted about among the trees and flowers.
See also: flit

flit from person to person

Fig. to move quickly from person to person or thing to thing. (See also flit from something to something else.) Tom flitted quickly from person to person, handing out snacks and beverages. The singer flitted from table to table, working the crowd for tips.
See also: flit, person

flit from (something to something else)

 
1. Lit. [for an insect] to fly quickly from one thing to another. The butterfly flitted from flower to flower.
2. Fig. [for someone] to go quickly from task to task, spending little time on each one. The housekeeper only flits from room to room without ever getting anything completely clean.
See also: flit

do a moonlight flit

make a hurried, usually nocturnal, removal or change of abode, especially in order to avoid paying your rent. informal
Make a moonlight flitting is recorded from the early 19th century and appears to have originated in northern England or Scotland. The expression is now often shortened to do a moonlight .
See also: flit, moonlight

do a moonlight ˈflit

(British English, informal) leave the place where you have been living in quickly and secretly, usually to avoid paying your debts, rent, etc: When I called to get the money she owed me, I found she’d done a moonlight flit.
See also: flit, moonlight
References in periodicals archive ?
That may explain why butterflies often appear to bask in the sun before flitting into the air.
Whitener defined his fairies with quick, forward-carrying steps and wrist-flicking arm movements that evoked images of winged creatures flitting through the night; later, an extended pas de deux for Titania and Oberon used a graver, more dignified style to convey a sense of natural order restored.
The scherzo of the third movement had its visible analogue in the image of the flitting butterfly of Diana Vishneva.
In the flitting duet to rescued musical passages from Swan Lake, Douglas Gawriljuk created commodious perches with his sizable frame for that hummingbird, Mabel Modrono, yet each delighted in taking off with youthful individualism.