flit

(redirected from flitting)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to flitting: swills

do a moonlight flit

To depart hastily at night, typically to avoid paying money that one owes. I can't afford the rent this month, so we need to do a moonlight flit!
See also: flit, moonlight

flit about

To move in a quick, deft manner. The kids are outside, trying to catch the lightning bugs that are flitting about. I think Anita is flitting about the office, straightening up. Good luck finding her.
See also: flit

flit from (something to something)

To move quickly from thing to thing. I'm sorry, I have to go inside—there are just too many bees flitting from plant to plant out here! You wouldn't make so many mistakes if you stopped flitting from job to job and really focused on what you were doing.
See also: flit

flit from (something) to (something)

To move quickly from thing to thing. I'm sorry, I have to go inside—there are just too many bees flitting from plant to plant out here! You wouldn't make so many mistakes if you stopped flitting from job to job and really focused on what you were doing.
See also: flit

flit from person to person

To move quickly from one person to another. That guy's a politician, so he's just spent the whole night flitting from person to person, naturally.
See also: flit, person

moonlight flit

A hasty nighttime departure, typically done to avoid paying money that one owes. Primarily heard in UK. I can't afford the rent this month, so we need to make a moonlight flit!
See also: flit, moonlight

flit about

to move about quickly; to dart about. A large number of hummingbirds were flitting about. Butterflies and moths flitted about among the trees and flowers.
See also: flit

flit from person to person

Fig. to move quickly from person to person or thing to thing. (See also flit from something to something else.) Tom flitted quickly from person to person, handing out snacks and beverages. The singer flitted from table to table, working the crowd for tips.
See also: flit, person

flit from (something to something else)

 
1. Lit. [for an insect] to fly quickly from one thing to another. The butterfly flitted from flower to flower.
2. Fig. [for someone] to go quickly from task to task, spending little time on each one. The housekeeper only flits from room to room without ever getting anything completely clean.
See also: flit

do a moonlight flit

make a hurried, usually nocturnal, removal or change of abode, especially in order to avoid paying your rent. informal
Make a moonlight flitting is recorded from the early 19th century and appears to have originated in northern England or Scotland. The expression is now often shortened to do a moonlight .
See also: flit, moonlight

do a moonlight ˈflit

(British English, informal) leave the place where you have been living in quickly and secretly, usually to avoid paying your debts, rent, etc: When I called to get the money she owed me, I found she’d done a moonlight flit.
See also: flit, moonlight
References in periodicals archive ?
"Black Americans," Kovel writes, "were considered basically subhuman animals while Native Americans became the inhuman devils (a beast, too, though of the apocalypse) flitting through the wilderness beyond the city upon the hill; two nightmares as yet undigestible by the dominant culture, the one sedimenting into white racism, the other into anticommunism."
In 1973, biologists discovered the Poouli flitting about the lush rain forest that grows on the northeastern slope of a dormant volcano in Maui.
"HAVE fishing rod will travel" describes the flitting about done by James Hughes to find interesting fishing matches, and his last jaunt brought him a win at Southport's Bannister House.
LILY Allen, who spends a lot of time these days flitting between the UK and US, is meant to be recording the follow-up to her hit debut album, Alright, Still.
So whether you're flitting from a one-bedroom flat, a company wanting furniture delivered to clients or a finance firm looking to keep your documents safe - then M.Thomson can help.
Harald Scharff, a dancer at the Royal Theatre in Copenhagen, was famous for his "thick sensuous lips"; Andersen describes him as a flitting butterfly.
At midday yesterday, the red insects could be seen flitting high in the sky, some landing on rooftops.
(He would have approved of a sentence as long and hybridized as that one.) His flitting from project to project and medium to medium--as well as city to city; in his brief career he lived and worked in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles--was not evidence of aesthetic inconstancy but a reco rd of his peripatetic, febrile intellect.
You would think that, with all those yards of white tarlatan and young ladies flitting around on tiptoe, ethereal classical dance and classic ghost stories would have found a natural affinity.
Those trees had become unstuck in space, flitting about the country and arriving quite by chance in Arizona, Ohio, or--in my case--South Dakota.
Flitting from one seemingly unrelated topic to the next, the pundits compartmentalize current affairs into discrete little pellets carefully encapsulated so as not to bleed into each other.
At night, the leaf comes alive, flitting about in search of food and mates.
A STRIKING image of a butterfly will be shown flitting across the outside wall of the Tate Liverpool on Monday.
She had been too exhausted to take them inside after flitting from London.
Whitener defined his fairies with quick, forward-carrying steps and wrist-flicking arm movements that evoked images of winged creatures flitting through the night; later, an extended pas de deux for Titania and Oberon used a graver, more dignified style to convey a sense of natural order restored.