flit

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do a moonlight flit

To depart hastily at night, typically to avoid paying money that one owes. I can't afford the rent this month, so we need to do a moonlight flit!
See also: flit, moonlight

flit about

To move in a quick, deft manner. The kids are outside, trying to catch the lightning bugs that are flitting about. I think Anita is flitting about the office, straightening up. Good luck finding her.
See also: flit

flit from (something to something)

To move quickly from thing to thing. I'm sorry, I have to go inside—there are just too many bees flitting from plant to plant out here! You wouldn't make so many mistakes if you stopped flitting from job to job and really focused on what you were doing.
See also: flit

flit from (something) to (something)

To move quickly from thing to thing. I'm sorry, I have to go inside—there are just too many bees flitting from plant to plant out here! You wouldn't make so many mistakes if you stopped flitting from job to job and really focused on what you were doing.
See also: flit

flit from person to person

To move quickly from one person to another. That guy's a politician, so he's just spent the whole night flitting from person to person, naturally.
See also: flit, person

moonlight flit

A hasty nighttime departure, typically done to avoid paying money that one owes. Primarily heard in UK. I can't afford the rent this month, so we need to make a moonlight flit!
See also: flit, moonlight

flit about

to move about quickly; to dart about. A large number of hummingbirds were flitting about. Butterflies and moths flitted about among the trees and flowers.
See also: flit

flit from person to person

Fig. to move quickly from person to person or thing to thing. (See also flit from something to something else.) Tom flitted quickly from person to person, handing out snacks and beverages. The singer flitted from table to table, working the crowd for tips.
See also: flit, person

flit from (something to something else)

 
1. Lit. [for an insect] to fly quickly from one thing to another. The butterfly flitted from flower to flower.
2. Fig. [for someone] to go quickly from task to task, spending little time on each one. The housekeeper only flits from room to room without ever getting anything completely clean.
See also: flit

do a moonlight flit

make a hurried, usually nocturnal, removal or change of abode, especially in order to avoid paying your rent. informal
Make a moonlight flitting is recorded from the early 19th century and appears to have originated in northern England or Scotland. The expression is now often shortened to do a moonlight .
See also: flit, moonlight

do a moonlight ˈflit

(British English, informal) leave the place where you have been living in quickly and secretly, usually to avoid paying your debts, rent, etc: When I called to get the money she owed me, I found she’d done a moonlight flit.
See also: flit, moonlight
References in periodicals archive ?
Flitter says the buoys are currently deployed with cameras, infrared cameras, and sensors that measure oil, pH, and salinity.
The Romanticism that Flitter finds in these and other sources joins this moralistic drive to a new emphasis on contemporary society, as Alcala Galiano's prologue to Rivas's El moro exposito (1833) reveals.
Little does he know that his pride and joy is already beginning to unravel the mystery of suicidal Hollywood actress Dehlia Draycott (Harring) with help from best friend Ned (Thieriot) and new admirer Corky (Flitter).
Inexplicably flanked at all times by an equally annoying young boy (Josh Flitter) who he's mentoring, Rev.
"In the last year or so, there's been a resurgence in looking more closely at the numbers and a lot of fine tuning of advertising campaigns," Flitter says.
And while dressing like a member of the traveling cast of "The Pirates of Penzance" will still guarantee an ass-beating in most of America, on the balmy shores of the beautiful beach towns of Southern California fanny lads can safely flitter and shut (the only possible adverse effect being a long look from some love-struck lass).
The volume concludes with two contrasting but well-researched pieces: in what, sadly, would have been one of his final writings, the breadth of Colin Smith's scholarship is amply demonstrated in his account of Alvaro Cunquiero's debt to English literature, in particular, his rewriting of Hamlet; and Patricia McDermott supplies a concise but penetrating insight into the politico-cultural impact of Revindicacion del conde Don Julian, though her conclusion is somewhat marred by her unqualified acceptance of Peers's notion that the Romantic Movement in Spain was a 'failure'--an untenable assumption in the wake of Flitter's research in this area.
Newport pressed hard until the interval with Shephard and Cowe having shots blocked following a Nathan Davies cross, but the match took a negative turn for County after the interval when defender Matt Flitter converted a corner to put the home side ahead.
Worcester had the worst possible start, going behind after only two minutes when Matt Flitter fired home from close range.
Teach me a gamut; singing backwards to before my divorce so I may flitter home again into the realms of dreaming before sleeping, Uh huh.
Congressional investigators from the House's Intelligence and Financial Services committees issued a subpoena to President Donald Trump's longtime lender Deutsche Bank (DB) and also demanded documents from other financial institutions including JPMorgan (JPM), Bank of America (BAC) and Citigroup (C) related to possible money-laundering, the New York Times' Emily Flitter and David Enrich report, citing three people with knowledge of the investigation.
And as grimy as the place is, pity poor old King Richard III who, since he ended up on the wrong end of a broadsword at the Battle of Bosworth Field in August, 1485, lay under what is now a car park in the city centre here, where the students walk to for cheap suds and gamblers flitter away money they can ill afford at the blinking slot machines.
Nancy Drew (RTE Two, 12.35pm - 2.20pm) Detective adventure, starring Emma Roberts, Josh Flitter, Rachael Leigh Cook and Tate Donovan.
Paint your own bird box The sweet chirruping of birds as they flitter about the garden of a Sunday morning surely ranks as one of the loveliest natural pleasures out there.
(Josh Flitter of Nancy Drew and License to Wed) teams with adventurous girl-next-door Laura (Emma Lockhart) and nerdish gizmo-wiz A-Plus (Austin Rogers) to chase leads and laughs.