fly apart

(redirected from flew apart)

fly apart

To break into pieces violently; to shatter. There are bits of wood everywhere because that rickety old chair flew apart the minute I put that heavy box on it.
See also: apart, fly
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fly apart

to break apart, throwing pieces around. Don't run the engine too fast or it will fly apart! Mary's bicycle wheel flew apart during the race.
See also: apart, fly
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
Presently a bell sounded, the curtains flew apart, and the OPERATIC TRAGEDY began.
The moment the clasp was open the belt flew apart several inches, for it was impossible to restrain the involuntary sigh of relief that flatly contradicted her words.
The market-place and the people were like the sea when the storm cometh on: they all flew apart and in disorder, especially where the body was about to fall.
His joints cracked; he said, "Ha!" and they flew apart. But the carpenter showed the greater intelligence.
The tensions grew to the point that the band flew apart in the most public of ways -- a fight on stage in Lubbock, Texas, between Fafara and Rascon, during which the singer was smacked in the head by the headstock of Rascon's guitar.
The accident took place when the hull was being pressure tested and one of the hatches flew apart.
In the end, the bedroom walls flew apart, the lovers sang their charming duet against a haystack and Schicchi addressed the audience, alone again on a bare stage.
All the islands flew apart recreating exactly the void between the stones, refueling themselves with wind at every stop.
As the fork was raised, the weight of the load caused the arms to hold it tightly until over the mow, where the latch was tripped, the arms flew apart and the load dropped.
It was an era of dirt tracks, drunk fans pressed along the track, and big clunky cars that flipped on curves and flew apart on impact.
Best description of a crash and burn: "A snow snake came up and grabbed his foot," from an NBC announcer - either Trace Worthington or Steve Podborski - when American skier Joe Pack flew apart on his landing during the aerial semi-finals.
New models by Eggleton, along with Alessia Gualandris and Simon Portegies Zwart of the University of Amsterdam, trace how these stars probably came together and flew apart. Iota Orionis A, the brighter member of the Iota Orionis pair, likely began in a binary with AE Aurigae, while Iota Orionis B started life paired with Mu Columbae.
They just knew that if a prop turned too fast, it flew apart at the end.