flee

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flee from (someone or something)

To run away from or escape someone or something. The thieves fled from the security guard but were caught by officers arriving on the scene. Shrieking, we fled from the swarm of bees.
See also: flee

flee to (something)

To run to some place or thing as a means of escape. We fled to the shelter of the cave when the downpour started.
See also: flee

flee from someone or something

to run away from someone or something. The robber fled from the scene of the crime. The children fled from the wrath of the old man.
See also: flee

flee to something

to escape to something or some place. We fled to our little place on the coast. They never found us. The little mouse fled to its hole in the wall when the cat came around.
See also: flee
References in periodicals archive ?
Cinna, metaphorically at least, flees his commitments to his fellow conspirators, while Polyeucte quite literally repeatedly attempts to flee confrontation with Pauline (1.2; 4.1-2).
Third, no stigma is attached to fleeing a confrontation if the one who flees is a woman.
Matamore, a perfect parody of the heroic figure, flees at the slightest sign of a threat, in marked contrast to his claims to be fearless.
The three Curiaces are all injured and two Horace brothers are dead when the third Horace, who remains unscathed, flees the scene.
(8) David Maskell views Horace's flight as a "temporary lapse into female role-playing," based on Corneille's statement in his 1660 Examen of Horace attributing to women, in this case Camille, a propensity to flee the threat of death ("la frayeur si naturelle au sexe lui doit faire prendre la fuite") (276).
The elder Horace hurries onstage to save the young men by urging them to flee: "ce n'est qu'en fuyant qu'on pare de tels coups" (2.7.685).
First and foremost, it is morally unacceptable for a male to flee a confrontation with another male.
Generally, the majority of the fugitives who flee from U.S.
However, fugitives who flee to Mexico while on bail or are free on recognizance, pending sentencing and awaiting appellate resolution, can be prosecuted under Article IV.
[35] All Wardlow adds to the law in this area is that if the individual flees, instead of walking away, the officer may consider the flight in the totality of circumstances in deciding if there is a reasonable suspicion of criminal activity.
Law enforcement administrators must continue to evaluate their policies concerning what actions are appropriate when an individual flees upon the approach of a police officer.
If they flee upon seeing an officer, is the officer justified in temporarily detaining them in an attempt to determine why they fled?