flavor (something) with (something)

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flavor (something) with (something)

To add something, such as a spice or an herb, to a dish to enhance or improve its flavor. I'm begging you, please don't flavor the guacamole with cilantro—I hate the taste of it. My Italian relatives love to flavor everything with garlic.
See also: flavor
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

flavor food with something

to season a food with something. He flavors his gravy with a little sage. Can you flavor the soup with a little less pepper next time?
See also: flavor, food
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Another vegetarian one-pot dish from Indonesia combines seasonal vegetables, such as cabbage, spinach, onions, corn, potatoes, and squash, with vegetable broth and is flavored with tamarind, cinnamon, bay leaf, garlic, and ginger.
It's aromatic, flavored with spices including cardamom and cinnamon, and using capsicums of all types so that it's getting hotter all of the time.
Moroccan mint tea is a brisk blend of gunpowder green tea and peppermint leaves, while Earl Grey, a famous British tea, is made up of black tea leaves flavored with bergamot orange oil.
Groups of the first three bats were given food flavored with cinnamon, a spice that these Western Hemisphere animals wouldn't have encountered.
However, beans flavored with non-kosher flavors most probably are brewed in the same equipment used for kosher flavored beans.
In this test, saccharin and dextrose were combined (sac/dex) and flavored with cherry or grape.
"Products that are flavored with honey, aloe or cane sugar, for example, will appeal to the healthful, natural trend."
Roasted coffee beans flavored with Irish Cream, Hazelnut, and other creative tastes, such as Danish pastry, became profitable best sellers in the 1980's and 1990's in the U.S.
Many frozen food products contain sauces, gravies and other products flavored with natural savory flavors.
South America is not a tea market, and Latin America is conservative regarding flavors for coffee, but there is an increased interest for tourists." Virginia Dare thinks coffee will most likely be flavored with syrups rather than flavoring the beans.
For that reason, he predicts that more roasters will offer ground coffee flavored with high quality powdered flavoring.
Iced tea flavored with lemon or peach, for example, is a recent introduction in this field and enjoys great popularity not only in America, but also in many European countries, particularly in Switzerland and Italy.
Lattes and cappuccinos flavored with syrup have proven immensely popular.
In iced tea, he comments, "we have seen great interest in iced tea flavored with a fruit and spice combination; flavors like Cranberry Spice iced tea and Lemon Apple Spice iced tea may become 'hot' sellers in the near future."
The coffee had been ground and then flavored with powdered flavoring.