flashing

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flash

1. verb, slang To expose one's nudity indecently. There have been reports of a man in Central Park flashing tourists as they walk by.
2. noun, slang The sense of euphoria created by the use of a drug; a rush. The flash from that very first line of cocaine hooked me in an instant. I've been chasing that high ever since.
3. adjective, informal Showy and attention-grabbing; stylish or ostentatious. Primarily heard in UK. He loves to wear fancy suits and drive to work in flash cars. She showed up to the party looking pretty flash.

flash across (something)

1. To move or appear quickly across something. When my headlights flashed across a deer in the middle of the road, I brought the car to a screeching halt. Fear flashed across Jason's face as he tumbled out of the tree.
2. To quickly enter one's mind. An image of my keys on the dining room table suddenly flashed across my mind, and I remembered where I'd left them.
See also: across, flash

flash around

To show or reveal something, often in a quick gesture. A noun or pronoun can be used between "flash" and "around." Oh yeah, Katie's been flashing around her engagement ring constantly since Tom proposed—it's so annoying.
See also: around, flash

flash back

1. verb To momentarily show or describe a past time or occurrence, as in a book, movie, or TV show. I liked that part when the narrator flashed back to all the times she had encountered the strange man before.
2. verb To unexpectedly recall or re-experience something from the past. That particular smell always makes me flash back to my childhood.
3. noun An instance in which someone recalls or re-experiences something from the past. In this usage, the phrase is usually written as one word. That particular smell always makes me have a momentary childhood flashback.
See also: back, flash

flash forward

1. verb To depict future events, as in a book, TV show, or movie. The show then flashes forward to connect the present and the future.
2. noun A scene or instance in a book, TV show, or movie that depicts future events. In this usage, the phrase is often hyphenated or written as one word. The show makes use of flash-forwards to connect the present and the future.
See also: flash, forward

flash into view

To move or rise into sight, especially from a distance. We'd been walking for hours in the barren desert when a small town finally flashed into view.
See also: flash, view

flash off

To abruptly turn or go off, as of lights. As the man laughed manically, the lights in the haunted house flashed off, and we all screamed.
See also: flash, off

flash on

1. To abruptly turn on, as of lights. As the man laughed manically, the lights in the haunted house flashed on, and we all ran out, screaming.
2. To illuminate someone or something. I repositioned my lamp so that it flashed on the things I'd dropped behind my bureau.
3. slang To think of or recall something. It took some time, but we finally flashed on a solution to that problem.
See also: flash, on

flash out

To shine or glow from some thing or place. Hey, I can see the light of your phone flashing out from under the covers—go to bed!
See also: flash, out

flash the hash

slang To vomit. I felt so seasick out on that boat that I'm amazed I didn't flash the hash.
See also: flash, hash

flash up

1. To flash very brightly and suddenly. The lightning had only just flashed up when the crack of the thunder boomed nearby. The car's headlights flashed up, signaling me that a speed trap was nearby.
2. Of a computer notification or message, to appear on the screen very suddenly. By the time the warnings began flashing up on our screens, the reactor had already begun to melt down. A little message flashed up in the bottom corner of my browser telling me that I had won $1 million.
See also: flash, up

flash with (an emotion)

Of the eyes, to seem to convey a particular feeling or emotion with intensity. Callie's eyes flashed with anger when I accused her of cheating on the test. Of course John's interested in you—his eyes practically flash with desire every time he looks at you. Yeah, my mom knows you—her eyes flashed with recognition when I said your name.
See also: flash
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

flash back (to someone or something)

to return briefly to a view of someone or something in the past. (In films, literature, and television.) The story suddenly flashed back to Tom when he was a child. The story flashed back to Tom's childhood.
See also: back, flash

flash back (to someone or something)

to return briefly to a view of someone or something in the past. (In films, literature, and television.) The story suddenly flashed back to Tom when he was a child. The story flashed back to Tom's childhood.
See also: back, flash

flash into view

Fig. to move quickly into view. Suddenly, a doe and her fawn flashed into view. A bright parrot flashed into view and squawked raucously.
See also: flash, view

flash off

[for a light] to go off suddenly. (See also flash on.) The light flashed off and it was dark for a few minutes. When the lights flashed off, I was setting my watch.
See also: flash, off

flash on

[for a light] to turn on suddenly. The light flashed on and woke us up. When the light flashed on, I had just been getting to sleep.
See also: flash, on

flash on someone or something

[for a light] to shine on someone or something suddenly or in bursts. The orange neon light flashed on John's face, making him look quite strange. The light flashed on the window shade, startling the occupants of the room.
See also: flash, on

flash on something

Sl. to remember something suddenly and vividly. Then I flashed on a great idea. I was trying to flash on her name, but I couldn't bring it to mind.
See also: flash, on

flash out

[for a light] to shine out of something suddenly or in bursts. The light flashed out, signaling us to stay away from the rocks. Under the door, we saw a light flashing out. Someone was watching television in that room.
See also: flash, out

flash something around

to display something so everyone can see it. (Usually something one would hold in one's hand.) Don't flash your money around on the streets. She flashed around the pictures of her grandchildren every chance she got.
See also: around, flash

flash something up (some place)

to shine a light upwards toward something. Flash your light up into the tree. She flashed up her light at the cat in the tree. Gloria flashed the light up.
See also: flash, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flash back

v.
1. To undergo a change of scene to a previous point in time as a narrative device: In this chapter, the main character flashes back to her youth.
2. To remember or reexperience a previous point in time, usually suddenly: Whenever he hears sirens, he flashes back to his service in Vietnam.
See also: back, flash

flash forward

v.
To undergo a change of scene to a future point in time as a narrative device: The first scene of the movie shows a boy playing with a ball, and then the next scene flashes forward to the character's adulthood.
See also: flash, forward
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flash

1. n. something suddenly remembered; something suddenly thought of. I had a flash and quickly wrote it down.
2. n. a very short period of time; an instant. (see also in a flash.) I’ll be there in a flash.
3. tv. to display something briefly. You’d better not flash a wad like that around here. You won’t have it long.
4. in. to display one’s private parts briefly. She flashed briefly, providing the show that people came to see, and left the stage.
5. n. a drink of liquor. Here, have a little flash, and let’s chat a little longer.

flash the hash

tv. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. Dave left quickly to go out and flash the hash, I think.
See also: flash, hash
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
* Flashings at Curtainwalls and Window Walls: Flashing concepts for PTACs installed within curtainwalls or window walls are similar to those outlined for cavity wall systems.
Work from the top down, removing any shingles covering the vent flashing. Getting the tabs free without ripping them is the only tricky part.
Flashing alternatives included mechanically fastened and self-adhering flashing.
Perimeter/raised flashing: Watch for flashing membrane slippage or displacement, tears, punctures, membrane bridging at the deck/wall juncture, open laps or seam delamination.
Cover the repair with bitumen mastic or a piece of self-adhesive flashing and then add more chippings on top.
You'll want to install new chimney flashing if it's missing, rusted through, falling out or completely covered with roofing tar (a typical short-term fix that's sure to be hiding bigger problems).
Then he showed me, first on roofs, then elsewhere around a house, the vulnerable areas water would enter and how to properly fabricate metal flashings that would seal the entry points.
The EPDM roofing process has two steps: anchoring the membrane to the roof so it'll stay put, and "flashing" corners and edges so the membrane won't leak at vulnerable points.
With the shingles and old metal flashings removed, work over the entire roof surface, pulling out all old roofing nails, renailing loose roof boards, and replacing rotten ones (photo 2).
This movement can cause flashings to stretch and tear open.