flash forward

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flash forward

1. verb To depict future events, as in a book, TV show, or movie. The show then flashes forward to connect the present and the future.
2. noun A scene or instance in a book, TV show, or movie that depicts future events. In this usage, the phrase is often hyphenated or written as one word. The show makes use of flash-forwards to connect the present and the future.
See also: flash, forward
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

flash forward

v.
To undergo a change of scene to a future point in time as a narrative device: The first scene of the movie shows a boy playing with a ball, and then the next scene flashes forward to the character's adulthood.
See also: flash, forward
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The action then flashes forward to the present day.
"Humor and imagination lead the viewer through the winding story, which flashes forward and backward amid dream sequences and fantasies.
The next chapter flashes forward to 1999, where we meet two drugged-out and promiscuous California high school girls, products of largely absentee, wealthy parents working in the entertainment industry; the girls discuss the sorts of things one would imagine drugged-out, promiscuous high school girls discuss.
Starting as a turbulent romantic triangle at college in New York, the story then flashes forward 10 years to the present day.
The film then flashes forward to show Baldwin as the grown-up Brian McCaffrey - now a firefighter just like his dad.
As Maggie puzzles through her family's history, the images and family stories repeat, and the narrative flashes forward and back until, remarkably, the snaking threads of the stories combine to produce a narrative akin to the fabric of memory.
But in the concluding chapter to part I, Johnson flashes forward a year and a half later, informing readers that Fairchild's hired killer double-crossed him and that the bounty hunters got Fairchild in the end.
There are way too many flashbacks and flashes forward, meaning you're never sure where you are while, for the most part, Ewan and Ash seem to be appearing in separate films.
Its unusual, and now hallmark, use of six month flashes forward to set the scene have never been as jarring as they could be in, say, the early seasons of Lost.