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Related to flashes: Hot flashes
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flash

1. verb, slang To expose one's nudity indecently. There have been reports of a man in Central Park flashing tourists as they walk by.
2. noun, slang The sense of euphoria created by the use of a drug; a rush. The flash from that very first line of cocaine hooked me in an instant. I've been chasing that high ever since.
3. adjective, informal Showy and attention-grabbing; stylish or ostentatious. Primarily heard in UK. He loves to wear fancy suits and drive to work in flash cars. She showed up to the party looking pretty flash.

flash on

1. To abruptly turn on, as of lights. As the man laughed manically, the lights in the haunted house flashed on, and we all ran out, screaming.
2. To illuminate someone or something. I repositioned my lamp so that it flashed on the things I'd dropped behind my bureau.
3. slang To think of or recall something. It took some time, but we finally flashed on a solution to that problem.
See also: flash, on
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

flash

1. n. something suddenly remembered; something suddenly thought of. I had a flash and quickly wrote it down.
2. n. a very short period of time; an instant. (see also in a flash.) I’ll be there in a flash.
3. tv. to display something briefly. You’d better not flash a wad like that around here. You won’t have it long.
4. in. to display one’s private parts briefly. She flashed briefly, providing the show that people came to see, and left the stage.
5. n. a drink of liquor. Here, have a little flash, and let’s chat a little longer.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Other widespread beliefs about hot flashes that were dispelled by SWAN include the impact of certain foods, activities, and supplements.
Compared with women who reported no hot flashes, women who reported 1-5 days of hot flashes or 6 or more days of hot flashes during the past 2 weeks were significantly more likely to have elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B, and apolipoprotein A1.
By contrast, levels of lipoprotein (a) were not significantly different among women who reported no hot flashes, women who reported 1 to 5 days of hot flashes, and women who reported 6 or more days of hot flashes.
"This study provides a more nuanced understanding of the relationship between body size and hot flashes, emphasizing the important role of age," Rebecca Thurston, the study's lead author said.
One recent study found that in some firefly species, females prefer to mate with males whose flashes last the longest.
In general, when I ask women if they have a problem with hot flashes, they say it's not that bad when I am alone; it is just embarrassing when in public.
"It's been estimated that women suffer from hot flashes for one to five years, but I have seen several women in their 70s who were still dealing with them," says Wayne State University's Robert Freedman.
And while there are other options for hot flashes (see page 6), none are as effective as hormone therapy and none are FDA-approved for the purpose.
(15.) Flashes II No6 (Feb 1895) p.64; Primitive Methodist Magazine LXXV (1894) p.359.
The average frequency of hot flashes at the beginning of the study was 9.8 per day.
The women entered most of the studies averaging six or seven hot flashes per day, says Heidi D.
Studies on the antidepressants fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil) and venlafaxine (Effexor); the anti-seizure medication gabapentin (Neurontin); and the anti-hypertensives clonidine (Catapres) and methyldopa (Aldoril), find these medications significantly reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes in postmenopausal women.
What to do: Be wary of ads that market isoflavones as a treatment for menopausal hot flashes. And don't forget the placebo effect.
For while hormones may work best for moderate-to-severe hot flashes, a growing body of research finds that making some simple changes in your life can make a big difference when it comes to reducing the severity and number of milder hot flashes.
Yes, they know that estrogen curbs hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, mood swings, changes in sleep patterns, and other symptoms of menopause.