flaming

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flame

1. verb, slang To write angry messages online, especially those targeted toward someone, as on a forum or message board. The administrators are going to suspend your account if you keep flaming the message board.
2. noun, slang Such messages. The administrators are going to suspend your account if they see all these flames from you on the message board.
3. noun One's romantic partner. How am I supposed to forget about my old flame if I keep seeing her around town?

flame out

1. To be very unsuccessful or fail. That guy flamed out really quickly—his NBA career lasted only a few months.
2. To stop working or functioning properly, as due to the presence of excessive heat. The mechanic better not tell me my engine flamed out because I don't have enough money to deal with that right now.
See also: flame, out

flame up

1. To begin to burn. Don't worry, the tinder will flame up eventually.
2. To begin to burn more intensely. The fire suddenly flamed up and crackled even louder.
See also: flame, up

flame with (an emotion)

Of the eyes, to seem to convey a particular feeling or emotion with intensity. Callie's eyes flamed with anger when I accused her of cheating on the test. Of course John's interested in you—his eyes are practically flaming with desire every time he looks at you.
See also: flame

flaming

Of a homosexual man, very flamboyant. Potentially offensive. I respect James for being so flaming—that's just who he is.

flaming galah

slang A total fool. Primarily heard in Australia. Oh, he's a flaming galah, all right. Don't bother listening to a word he says.
See also: flaming
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

flame up

 
1. [for something] to catch fire and burst into flames. The trees flamed up one by one in the forest fire. Suddenly the car flamed up and exploded.
2. [for a fire] to expand and send out larger flames. The raging fire flamed up and jumped to even more trees. As firemen opened the door and came in, the fire flamed up and filled the room.
See also: flame, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flame out

v.
1. To fail: Their new Internet company flamed out after only a few months.
2. To emit a flame that causes a malfunction; to burn out. Used of engines: I tried to restore that old car, but the engine flamed out.
See also: flame, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flame

1. in. to write an excited and angry note in a computer forum or news group. (see also flamage.) Stop flaming a minute and try to explain your position calmly.
2. n. a verbal attack as in sense 1 My email is full of flames this morning!
3. in. to appear obviously homosexual. Man, she’s flaming today!
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
And of course, the image bank also harbors the countless eroticized and anarchic stage characters who ate Don Juan's descendants--among the most intriguing being a cluster of flamingly "shameless" female rule-breakers: Carmen, Lulu, Salome, Madame Merteuil.
After a dialogue in which the Devil convinces the Angel that "Jesus was all virtue" because he "acted from impulse not from rules," the Angel embraces the Devil's "flame of fire," is "consumed," and flamingly rises "as Elijah" (MHH Pl.
I could say much the same for the miracle of Magnolia's performances-each flamingly intense, yet all blended into an ensemble-or for the wonder of an actor- centered filmmaking that's intricately imagistic.
[has] not had for a hundred years any book that comes more direct and flamingly from the heart of a living man" (Froude 1: 84).
Also exceptional and prismatically surprising and eventful as supporting character Jacob was Noel Rayos, who gleefully personified his flamingly gay stage persona's many hyper personalities with great gusto!
and Jen's travails are overseen by Winston (David Turner), a terribly British, flamingly gay, glam-rock-styled accountant-turned-archangel and I mean arch.
But while the name-dropping may have changed, Band's take on group dynamics among a circle of 20-something gay men has proved surprisingly resilient, It's no coincidence that both Hearts and Punks (each appearing at gay film festivals this summer, then opening in the fall) borrow Band's birthday party premise for their opening scenes, Crowley's play--an immediate hit when it first opened off-Broadway in 1968--serves up a veritable roll call of timeless gay types: the self-pitying party host, Michael; his bookish, self-reliant confidant, Donald; the flamingly nelly Emory; the sharp-tongued Harold; "straight-acting" teacher Hank and his sometimes--straying lover, Larry; sexy, black Bernard; twinkle-hustler Cowboy; and married closet case Alan.