flame war


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flame war

slang An exchange of angry or inflammatory messages online, as on a forum or message board. The message board administrators suspended everyone involved in that flame war.
See also: flame, war
References in periodicals archive ?
TiKiBluESinBOOTS (2006) continued to post in the flame war, and tried to clarify that child abuse by an adult female was as serious as child abuse by an adult male:
Zoefive (2006) weighed in again in this flame war to insult Ervin in what could be described as a lesbian separatist fashion:
The combination of hostile insults and reiterations of passionately argued positions over the issue of whether child abuse by a woman was as serious as child abuse by a man makes this section of the discussion an example of both a flame war and consciousness-raising over the issue of child abuse.
Indeed it was--at the aptly-named Realty Check, one of several experiments in conducting more civilized discussion groups in a medium infamous for its conversational "rants," "flame wars," and "drive-bys."
It has remained remarkably free of "flame wars,"(5) and manages to stay on topic.
Even staid old e-mail has produced flames, and flame wars.
Some people have taken flaming to an art form, and luxuriate in flame wars.
The online world has its own forms of pollution: vicious arguments (flame wars) and disguised commercial come-ons (spam).
Comments aren't always sycophantic, and there are healthy disagreements but few flame wars.
This freedom from previous boundaries "should be clearly explained to young people and new Internet users." Flame Wars can be related to this issue.
We could even see the emergence of information warfare between organised virtual communities, not mediated by military organisation at all - witness the flame wars which erupt regularly in news groups and Internet chat services.
For many of the thousands of experienced posters to the TECHWR-L mailing list, for example, much of the book's advice concerning online behavior and flame wars may be considered old news.
(Kehoe assures us that the Internet isn't just for the fun of it, and that Usenet is a "drop in the bucket" of the whole potential of Internet use, but his talk about flame wars in Cyberspace carries an "I want to be part of this too" appeal.)
Anonymous and pseudonymous feedback, the rule rather than the exception in Web forums, tends to encourage triviality and flame wars. Consider the Fray, slashdot.org, The Gate's reader for a, Salon's Table Talk, ZDNet feedback, or..