flack

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flack

1. verb To work in public relations. Flacking for an A-list actress is exhausting, let me tell you.
2. noun Someone who works in public relations. I'll have my flack put out a statement—hopefully, that will quash some of these rumors.
3. noun Publicity or attention. I doubt that trailer will generate a lot flack—it makes the movie look pretty dull.

flak

Criticism or judgment. It is a shortening of the German word Fliegerabwehrkanone, meaning "anti-aircraft gun." Come on, I'm trying my best—stop giving me so much flak.

flack out

 and flake out
Sl. to collapse with exhaustion; to lie down because of exhaustion. All the hikers flacked out when they reached the campsite. After a few hours, the hikers all flaked out.
See also: flack, out

flack (out)

in. to collapse in exhaustion; to go to sleep. Betsy flacked out at nine every night.
See also: flack, out

flack

verb

flak

and flack (flæk)
1. n. complaints; criticism; negative feedback. (Originally referred to antiaircraft guns and the explosions and damage they caused. The first form is an initialism from German Fliegerabwehrkanonen = flyer defense cannons. I.e., the initial fl plus the first a plus the k.) Why do I have to get all the flak for what you did?
2. n. publicity; hype. Who is going to believe this flack about being first-rate?
3. n. a public relations agent or officer. The flak made an announcement and then disappeared.

flack

verb
See flak
References in periodicals archive ?
"Are they for real complimenting Caroline Flack's polka dot dress?
"Caroline Flack decided to dress as her own mother to feel included tonight," posted another, while one added: "Why does Caroline flack dress like a 20 year old?"
Rosenthal and Flacks' greatest contribution is their insistence upon the theoretical triad "transmission-reception-context." They argue that scholars must first examine "transmission," which entails how an artist expresses their message lyrically, musically, aesthetically, and through various other modes of performance and identity.
Divided into three parts, Rosenthal and Flacks' study is a welcomed intervention within the current historiography of popular music studies given its intention to complicate theoretical approaches and understandings of how music can be liberatory.
Recently launched "Whack-a- Flack" allows reporters some cyber-retaliation, giving them a chance to pummel publicists with paper airplanes fashioned out of press releases.
As a veteran public relations counselor, I was delighted to be joined by my friend Steve Milloy of junkscience.com in being lauded in the article "Flack Attack" (Sheldon Rampton and John Stauber, October issue) for our "ability to take those arguments out of the mouths of corporations and put them in the mouths of citizens who read their web pages and come away persuaded that there is a `green genocide agenda' that is `tangible, identifiable, and utterly relentless.'"
We never claimed that his appearance in the Yearbook proves in itself that he is a "flack."
Caroline Flack 'spent two nights' with rugby ace Danny Cipriani on romantic getaway
Caroline Flack jets to Dubai with Pussycat Doll Ashley Roberts for girly holiday