fitting

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ain't fittin' to roll with a pig

Dirty and/or boorish. After spending all day doing construction work, Jack ain't fittin' to roll with a pig.
See also: pig, roll

fit on the back of a postage stamp

A phrase used when one knows little about something. The idea is that one could only fill a very small space—like the back of a postage stamp—writing what one knows about the topic. I am definitely going to fail this test—what I know about Victorian poetry could fit on the back of a postage stamp!
See also: back, fit, of, on, postage, stamp

fit to drop

To be completely exhausted, fatigued, or worn out. I was fit to drop after only the first mile of the race; I could barely even walk for the rest of it!
See also: drop, fit

fit in(to)

1. To become assimilated into and accepted by a group. I just don't fit in with any of the kids at my new school.
2. To blend or work harmoniously with something. Working in a research lab really fits in with my shy personality.
3. To literally have enough space to be included within something. Can you fit these papers into that file? I know it's practically bulging at the seams.
See also: fit

fit like a glove

1. To be perfectly sized for someone, as of an article of clothing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fit" and "like." The alterations turned out great—that gown really fits you like a glove now. These shoes are too big—I need to find ones that fit like a glove so that I don't trip.
2. To be very suited for someone. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fit" and "like." She's very shy, so working in a research lab really fits her like a glove.
See also: fit, glove, like

fit the bill

To be helpful or useful in a certain situation. A: "I need another string of lights." B: "Will this one fit the bill?"
See also: bill, fit

ain't fittin' to roll with a pig

Rur. is or are filthy or uncouth. After a day's work in the hot sun, Clyde ain't fittin' to roll with a pig.
See also: pig, roll

fit like a glove

Fig. to fit very well; to fit snugly. My new shoes fit like a glove. My new coat is a little tight. It fits like a glove.
See also: fit, glove, like

fit like a glove

Be the right size and well suited; also, be in conformity with. For example, That position fits him like a glove. Tobias Smollett used this simile, rather incongruously, in Humphry Clinker (1771): "The boots ... fitted me like a glove." [Second half of 1700s] Also see to a T.
See also: fit, glove, like

fit the bill

or

fill the bill

COMMON If someone or something fits the bill, they are exactly the right person or thing for a particular situation. I wanted someone who really knew their way around film-making and I knew that Richard would fit the bill. Finding somewhere peaceful to paint was their main priority when it came to finding a home — and their 17th-century house on a remote hillside certainly fits the bill. `Tea? Coffee?' — `Coffee would just fill the bill.' Note: The `bill' in this expression is a public notice advertising something such as a show or a play.
See also: bill, fit

fit (or fill) the bill

be suitable for a particular purpose.
Bill in this context is a printed list of items on a theatrical programme or advertisement.
See also: bill, fit

fit (or ready) to drop

worn out; exhausted.
See also: drop, fit

fit like a glove

(of clothes) fit exactly.
1989 T. M. Albert Tales of an Ulster Detective McNinch invited him to try the shoe on his foot, which he did—and it fitted him like a glove.
See also: fit, glove, like

fit the ˈbill

(informal) be suitable for a purpose: We need a new sofa for the living room, and I think this one will fit the bill quite nicely.
See also: bill, fit

fit (somebody) like a ˈglove

(of a coat, dress, etc.) be the perfect size or shape for somebody: You look wonderful in that dress. It fits you like a glove.
See also: fit, glove, like