fitting

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ain't fittin' to roll with a pig

Dirty and/or boorish. After spending all day doing construction work, Jack ain't fittin' to roll with a pig.
See also: pig, roll

fit on the back of a postage stamp

Fit in a very small space, because there is very little content. This phrase is used to indicate that one knows very little about something. The idea is that one could only fill a very small space—like the back of a postage stamp—writing what one knows about the topic. I am definitely going to fail this test—what I know about Victorian poetry could fit on the back of a postage stamp!
See also: back, fit, of, on, postage, stamp

fit to drop

Completely exhausted, fatigued, or worn out. I was fit to drop after only the first mile of the race; I could barely even walk for the rest of it!
See also: drop, fit

fit in(to)

1. To become assimilated into and accepted by a group. I just don't fit in with any of the kids at my new school.
2. To blend or work harmoniously with something. Working in a research lab really fits in with my shy personality.
3. To be able to be placed within something because there is sufficient space. Do these papers fit into that file? I know it's practically bulging at the seams.
4. To be able to place something within something because there is sufficient space. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "fit" and "in(to)." Can you fit these papers into that file? I know it's practically bulging at the seams.
See also: fit

fit like a glove

1. To be perfectly sized for someone, as of an article of clothing. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fit" and "like." The alterations turned out great—that gown really fits you like a glove now. These shoes are too big—I need to find ones that fit like a glove so that I don't trip.
2. To be very suited for someone. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fit" and "like." She's very shy, so working in a research lab really fits her like a glove.
See also: fit, glove, like

fit the bill

To be helpful, useful, or what is needed in a certain situation. A: "I need another string of lights." B: "Will this one fit the bill?"
See also: bill, fit

fit a quart into a pint pot

To cram too much into a small container or space. (A quart is a larger amount than a pint, so getting a quart into a pint pot is impossible.) Primarily heard in UK. A: "Just sit on my suitcase while I try zipping it again." B: "Oh, quit trying to fit a quart into a pint pot."
See also: fit, pint, pot, quart

ain't fittin' to roll with a pig

Rur. is or are filthy or uncouth. After a day's work in the hot sun, Clyde ain't fittin' to roll with a pig.
See also: pig, roll

fit like a glove

Fig. to fit very well; to fit snugly. My new shoes fit like a glove. My new coat is a little tight. It fits like a glove.
See also: fit, glove, like

fit like a glove

Be the right size and well suited; also, be in conformity with. For example, That position fits him like a glove. Tobias Smollett used this simile, rather incongruously, in Humphry Clinker (1771): "The boots ... fitted me like a glove." [Second half of 1700s] Also see to a T.
See also: fit, glove, like

fit the bill

or

fill the bill

COMMON If someone or something fits the bill, they are exactly the right person or thing for a particular situation. I wanted someone who really knew their way around film-making and I knew that Richard would fit the bill. Finding somewhere peaceful to paint was their main priority when it came to finding a home — and their 17th-century house on a remote hillside certainly fits the bill. `Tea? Coffee?' — `Coffee would just fill the bill.' Note: The `bill' in this expression is a public notice advertising something such as a show or a play.
See also: bill, fit

fit a quart into a pint pot

or

squeeze a quart into a pint pot

BRITISH
If someone is trying to fit a quart into a pint pot or squeeze a quart into a pint pot, they are trying to put a large amount of something into a container or space that is too small. In putting together a `brief' article on the Tay Bridge Disaster, I was faced with the problem of fitting a quart into a pint pot, there being so much material available. We're trying to squeeze a quart into a pint pot in terms of the amount of time we have to cover everything. Note: Other verbs can be used instead of fit or squeeze. `The builders tried to put a quart into a pint pot,' he commented, pointing to the narrow space between the house and its neighbours either side. Note: A quart is a unit of measure for liquids. It is equal to two pints.
See also: fit, pint, pot, quart

fit (or fill) the bill

be suitable for a particular purpose.
Bill in this context is a printed list of items on a theatrical programme or advertisement.
See also: bill, fit

fit (or ready) to drop

worn out; exhausted.
See also: drop, fit

fit like a glove

(of clothes) fit exactly.
1989 T. M. Albert Tales of an Ulster Detective McNinch invited him to try the shoe on his foot, which he did—and it fitted him like a glove.
See also: fit, glove, like

fit the ˈbill

(informal) be suitable for a purpose: We need a new sofa for the living room, and I think this one will fit the bill quite nicely.
See also: bill, fit

fit (somebody) like a ˈglove

(of a coat, dress, etc.) be the perfect size or shape for somebody: You look wonderful in that dress. It fits you like a glove.
See also: fit, glove, like
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, he describes the campaign as functioning like clockwork, a fittingly mechanical simile, which goes quite uncoupled to the notorious fact that the Clintons ate never on time.
One thing I have discovered is that, fittingly, racing will play a big part in the pageant.
Both have conquered adversity to remain part of the Sutton landscape and on Saturday, Roger Smoldon was fittingly honoured in a ceremony to rename the ground after him.
Perhaps fittingly, Krisch says, one of the first high-energy accelerators to exploit the snake concept will be UNK, the Soviet Union's 3-trillon-electron-volt accelerator, located about 70 miles south of Moscow.
DENVER -- Hurricanes happen in Florida's Orange County, where, fittingly, the Software Defined Radio (SDR) Forum will hold its annual Technical Conference and Product Exposition next week (November 13-17 at the Wyndham Orlando Resort).
Hallelujah, the Buds gain their first point of 2007 and fittingly it's at the expense of Hearts, who have been generous to us.
Fittingly, his shop was in Cowbridge, the Vale of Glamorgan market town which has since garnered a reputation as a magnet for the kind of upmarket shoppers drawn to fair trade and eco-friendly goods.
Fittingly, UCLA couldn't push the ball into the end zone and settled for a field goal.
It's a title that fittingly reflects her nurturing, supportive teaching style.
It will be used to fund a three to five year programme of environmental and architectural conservation, archaeological research and tourist management, so that what remains of an astonishingly rich cultural heritage can be properly and fittingly preserved.
Fittingly they seem preoccupied as much with light as with darkness, or rather, with the formal interplay between the two.
Fittingly, the last number the Anniversary Song was another tribute to the late great Eva Cassidy.
Cradled between Gramercy Park and Murray Hill, the building is fittingly named 120 Gramercy Hill.
As a rush of horns carries the song to a fittingly festive conclusion, the hearts of the British pop star's ever-ardent contingent of gay male disciples can be heard fluttering madly.
This was found by Lord Chancellor Wriothesley, fittingly from a line of heralds.