fit to

fit something to something

to make something suit something else. Please try to fit your remarks to the audience. Can you fit the main course to the needs of all the people who are coming to dinner?
See also: fit
References in classic literature ?
The author is here supposed to be writing her own history, and in the very beginning of her account she gives the reasons why she thinks fit to conceal her true name, after which there is no occasion to say any more about that.
The pen employed in finishing her story, and making it what you now see it to be, has had no little difficulty to put it into a dress fit to be seen, and to make it speak language fit to be read.
I like to see that you know your manners; and you are by no means such a person as the general thought fit to describe you.
The only place that is fit to live in--for this excellent reason, that the French are the only people who know how to make the most of life.
This was all my master thought fit to tell me, at that time, of what passed in the grand council.
It is true that, in order to see if it was strong and fit to stand a cut, he drew his sword and gave it a couple of slashes, the first of which undid in an instant what had taken him a week to do.
Her name was Aldonza Lorenzo, and upon her he thought fit to confer the title of Lady of his Thoughts; and after some search for a name which should not be out of harmony with her own, and should suggest and indicate that of a princess and great lady, he decided upon calling her Dulcinea del Toboso -she being of El Toboso- a name, to his mind, musical, uncommon, and significant, like all those he had already bestowed upon himself and the things belonging to him.
This tree seemed to bear all the year around, for there were lunch-box blossoms on some of the branches, and on others tiny little lunch-boxes that were as yet quite green, and evidently not fit to eat until they had grown bigger.
Whin I was about three-quarters av a mile off the rest-camp, powtherin' along fit to burrst, I heard the noise av the men, an', on my sowl, Sorr, I cud catch the voice av Peg Barney bellowin' like a bison wid the belly-ache.
Tis a shame both to the rig'mints and the Arrmy sendin' down little orf'cer bhoys wid a draf' av strong men mad wid liquor an' the chanst av gettin' shut av India, an' niver a punishment that's fit to be given right down an' away from cantonmints to the dock
There was Peg Barney sittin' on the groun' in his shirt - wan shoe off an' wan shoe on - whackin' a tent-peg over the head wid his boot, an' singin' fit to wake the dead.
They come round me an' shuk me, an' I tould thim I was in privit employ wid an income av me own, an' a drrrawin'-room fit to bate the Quane's; an' wid me lies an' me shtories an' nonsinse gin'rally, I kept 'em quiet in wan way an' another, knockin' roun' the camp.
The non-coms tuk Peg Barney - a howlin' handful he was - an' in three minut's he was pegged out - chin down, tight-dhrawn - on his stummick, a tent-peg to each arm an' leg, swearin' fit to turn a naygur white.
After a few more words with the female, during which she assured him that I was now fully fit to travel, the jed ordered that we mount and ride after the main column.
This undeconstructed form of fit is known as "perceived" fit (also known as "Gestalt fit") and it relates to a person's overall sense of fit to their employing organization.